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Swartz Creek man convicted of shooting death at nightclub

FLINT, Mich. (WNEM) – On Tuesday, a jury found a Swartz Creek man guilty in the 2019 shooting death of a 23-year-old Flint woman, according to Genesee County District Attorney David Leyton.

Delano Deshawn Cummings, 33, was convicted of second degree murder, two firearms charges and felon in possession of a firearm for the murder of Shalaycia Miles during a fight at the exterior of a nightclub.

According to testimonies and investigators, Miles had gone out on June 15, 2019, with family and friends to celebrate a family member’s birthday. The night took them to What’s Next, a former nightclub, near the corner of Pasadena Avenue and Clio Road in Flint.

Investigators say that’s when Miles and his group got into a fight with others in the parking lot, which started with punches and ended with guns being drawn and resounding shots. Miles was struck twice in the back and once in the forearm.

After the gunfire stopped, prosecutor David Leyton said Miles’ boyfriend and others took her to Hurley Medical Center, but her boyfriend was going too fast as he took a sharp turn and the vehicle rolled and ejected Miles.

Miles and her boyfriend were eventually taken by a passerby to McLaren Hospital where she was pronounced dead.

“What was supposed to be a fun night to celebrate a birthday turned into a horribly tragic and senseless incident that left a young woman dead and will now put another person

behind bars for a very long time,” Leyton said. “While no criminal trial is ever as straightforward as it appears on television, this case presented particularly difficult logistical and witness hurdles for my staff and police to overcome and, I would like to thank all the world for their tenacity in bringing justice to the victim, her family and friends, and our community.

Cummings is expected to be sentenced on April 26.

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Restaurants

UPDATE: Developer requesting permit to add two restaurants in front of Kmart building | Featured Story

BATAVIA – The Kmart building on Lewiston Road would still be empty, but part of the parking lot in front of Kmart, facing Lewiston Road, could contain a few new restaurants.

Benderson Development LLC, which owns the property, requests a special use permit and site plan review when the county planning board meets via Zoom at 7 p.m. Thursday.

County planner Felipe Oltramari said the additions would not affect the vacant Kmart.

“They’re going to build two new buildings in front of the north side and the south side of the parking lot. We don’t know what the restaurants will be,” Oltramari said. “One of them will be a restaurant or a retail space, but there will be a café as the end of the building. The other building will be a drive-thru restaurant.

One restaurant would be about 4,000 square feet and the other a total of about 8,752 square feet, including the 2,000 square foot cafe, he said.

Oltramari said the city requires a special use permit for any project that includes a drive-thru, whether it’s a restaurant, pharmacy, etc.

Benderson offers two drive-thru lanes. The total project size would be 10,752 square feet.

In a letter to members of the Batavia City Planning Board, Benderson said the project would include the following:

not drainage upgrades to bring the site into compliance with current stormwater regulations;

not an increase in overall green space and landscaping;

not new curbs, pavement and site lighting around the proposed buildings.

“The project will take a vacant property and a large vacant car park and revitalize the front of the subject property along the road frontages – greatly improving this property and the area,” the owner said.

The two restaurant buildings will require 84 parking spaces and the site offers 366 parking spaces, which is more than enough for the proposed uses, Benderson said in its application. He also said the empty Kmart building didn’t need parking.

“At this point, there are no proposed uses for this (Kmart) building and any reuse of the old Kmart building should require significantly less parking than the old Kmart required by code…”, Benderson said. “When future development is proposed for the rear of the property, Benderson will return to the parking lot with the planning board at that time. We are asking the Planning Board to approve the parking lot as it is currently offered.

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Cafes

Hebron honors the retirement of Mark and Glenna Jones as owners of Clay’s Café

On Sunday afternoon, the Hebron community celebrated the retirement of Mark and Glenna Jones, longtime owners of Clay’s Café.

Linda Nicodemus, director of zoning for the village and close friend of the owners, presented an official proclamation that Hebron will recognize February 20 as “Mark and Glenna Jones Day”. The proclamation honors their 25 years of service supporting local businesses, celebrating music and art, and bringing families together over homemade sandwiches, pizza, stromboli and ice cream. They hired over 1,000 local high school students, keeping a meticulous record of everyone. Perhaps most importantly, at Sunday’s retirement party, they picked up the daintiest ice cream cones you’ve ever seen––each cone was two inches high––and donated them to their community. beloved.

“We are very honored and grateful for all the customers we have had over the years, grateful for the staff,” Glenna said. “It wasn’t a two-person show, just Mark and I. Our families, loyal customers and staff really made it possible.”

Mark and Glenna Jones, longtime owners of Clay's Café, receive a proclamation from Hebron honoring their service to the community.  The couple have retired as owners of the beloved restaurant.

The parking lot next to Clay’s was bustling in the unusually hot February sun, as old friends and families stopped to enjoy ice cream and snacks, share stories and laugh with retirees.

“It’s starting to sink in,” said retired Mark Jones. He plans to spend more time rebuilding his classic car: a 1972 Pontiac Le Mans. “I could do a few day trips, but I really want to spend more time with the grandkids.”

Glenna looks forward to relaxing and continuing her community support, including volunteer work with LifeWise Academy, a Bible study program for elementary school students. Maybe she will also help her husband with the Pontiac; she joked that Mark had to get his old car out of the garage so it could park.

During the week leading up to this celebration, the community followed on Facebook, reading daily stories in the “10 Days of Mark and Glenna Jones” series. These stories shared one thing in common: family.

In 1934, the original ice cream business was first opened across the street by newlyweds Dorothy Hamilton and Earl Cummins. Dorothy and Earl’s father moved to the current lot and built an ice cream building out of cement blocks. In 1936 they opened their business which eventually evolved into Clay’s Café. Their first promotion, a newspaper ad offering “free ice cream cones” to celebrate their grand opening, sparked a tradition of weekend treats for local families.

In the 1940s they briefly closed and transformed into the “Cummins Ice Cream Store”. The small store started selling groceries, and Earl Cummins secured a local milk delivery route to support the business. As popularity grew in the 1960s, they added an indoor ice cream counter and appliance store. After more than 40 years, the Cummins family finally retired and sold the property in 1977.

In 1979, after the store went through a brief period of inactivity, Evelyn and Sherm Clay (Glenna’s parents) bought the seized store at a sheriff’s auction and gave it a new name: “Country Fair Foods”. They started out selling only groceries, eventually adding ice cream using old Cummins machines. Evelyn started making hot sandwiches, then Glenna’s brother Phil designed ‘the Pizza Barn’, expanding their menu. Evelyn and Sherm operated until their retirement in 1997.

For a decade before Mark and Glenna returned to Hebron and took over the restaurant, they owned “The Sandwich Shack”, a similar business in West Virginia. When the time came, they pledged to keep their family business intact, acquiring “Country Fair Foods” and changing the name to “Clay’s Cafe.”

“Mark and I wanted to be the best business owners we could be,” said Glenna, a longtime Hebron resident. “We wanted a family and fun place.

They updated the property, creating a 10-year plan to add restrooms and parking, revamp the electrical and plumbing systems, and remodel the kitchen at the back of the building. While working to support the store’s growing popularity, Mark and Glenna also raised three children.

The Hebron community celebrated the retirement of Mark and Glenna Jones from Clay's Cafe on Sunday, February 20.

Towards the end of their 10-year plan in 2007, the Café held a street festival in its parking lot. Glenna remembers being told “you should do this every year,” so they created a tradition: Between 2008 and 2016, Mark and Glenna hosted the Hebron Music & Arts Festival. They also created the Hebron Business Association to support their peers in small businesses.

“We’re not spring chickens anymore,” Mark and Glenna said when discussing the sale of the business. The Jones couple had been in the restaurant business together for over 35 years and it was time to move on. Joshua Powell, 31, worked at Clay’s from 2005 to 2008 and had a strong relationship with the owners.

Alongside his Hawaii native partner, Joey Vericella, Joshua is the new owner of Clay’s Cafe. They intend to preserve the community bond by continuing the Café’s longstanding support of Hebron’s Lakewood T-Ball league and the many other groups they sponsor. Joshua also noted plans to replace some of the flooring and, more importantly, to retain the name and family history of Clay’s Café.

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Bars

Two men arrested in fatal shooting outside Miramar bar

Two men were arrested Saturday in a shooting outside a bar in Mira Mesa that left another dead hours earlier, San Diego police said Sunday.

Samuel Perez, 23, and Damani Wiltshire-Beal, 22, are charged with the fatal shooting of Kyle Delangel, 37, police said.

Delangel was shot outside the petrol station, formerly known as Off Base Bar, on Miramar Road west of Kearny Villa Road around 2am. Police say Delangel got into an altercation with two men.

The argument unfolded as the bar closed and escalated in the parking lot. The two men Delangel argued with were taking off in a car when they hit Delangel with the vehicle, Lt. Andra Brown said Sunday.

When Delangel approached from the driver’s side, one of the men in the car shot him, Brown said.

Paramedics took Delangel to the hospital, where he underwent emergency surgery. The National City resident died several hours later, Brown said.

Police found Perez near his home and arrested him Saturday afternoon, Brown said. Wiltshire-Beal was arrested on his way home that night.

Police did not say how detectives identified Perez and Wiltshire-Beal as suspects.

Anyone with information about the case has been asked to call homicide investigators at (619) 531-2293 or Crime Stoppers’ anonymous tip line at (888) 580-8477.

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Bars

1 dead, 4 injured after shooting at Murfreesboro hookah bar

MURFEESBORO, Tenn. (WKRN) — One man is dead and four others are injured following a shooting at a hookah bar in Murfreesboro early Saturday morning.

Officers responded to the Habibi Hookah Café in the 1600 block of Middle Tennessee Boulevard at 2 a.m. Saturday morning after a sergeant patrolling the area heard gunfire.

On the spot, the sergeant undertook rescue efforts on a male victim using a tourniquet. The male victim later died in hospital.

According to Murfreesboro police, four other people were shot and transported to a local hospital where their condition remains unknown.

Preliminary investigation shows two people began arguing in the parking lot of the hookah bar and a fight ensued before gunshots broke out.

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Investigators are trying to determine a suspect and the motive for the shooting.

No other information was immediately released.

Anyone with information should contact Detective Cody Thomas at 629-201-5537 or call Crime Stoppers at 615-893-STOP.

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Nightclubs

Man charged with killing 19-year-old woman in shooting at illegal Jefferson Park nightclub

A 27-year-old man is facing charges in connection with a shooting outside an illegal nightclub on the North West Side last month that left a 19-year-old woman dead and two others injured.

Rusten Relucio was denied bail on Thursday for murder and aggravated bodily harm during a hearing before Cook County Judge Susana Ortiz.

Meagan Bilbo was attending a party Dec. 5 at the club on the 4800 block of North Central Avenue in Jefferson Park when a masked person opened fire outside in a parking lot, prosecutors told the court.

The club – which operated illegally in a building that bore the signage of a computer repair shop – was open Thursday through Sunday each week, prosecutors said.

Bilbo was punched in the chest and his 22-year-old boyfriend was shot in the abdomen as they exited the building through a back door of the club at around 4.30 a.m. A 23-year-old man was punched in the abdomen and leg. , prosecutors said.

No motive for the shooting was provided to the court, but prosecutors said they were able to link Relucio to the attack via a Dodge Durango that was spotted driving by the club several times before the shooting.

Relucio’s face was “clearly captured” by CCTV cameras as he exited the front passenger seat of the Durango at a gas station about an hour before the murder, prosecutors said. Relucio was wearing unique clothing in the images, which also showed a skull tattoo on his left hand, which was missing several fingers, prosecutors added.

The Durango was seen pulling into a parking lot near the club and then driving down an alley moments before the shots were fired, prosecutors said. A person wearing clothes matching Relucio’s was then seen walking towards the club and firing multiple shots, prosecutors said.

The SUV is registered in Relucio’s name and his cellphone records showed his phone was in the area at the time of the shooting, prosecutors added.

Relucio works as a forklift operator, his defense attorney Dan Herbert said.

“The allegations against my client stand in stark contrast … to the way he lived his life,” Herbert said after court. “He never had any problems, he was never involved in gangs.”

Prosecutors said Relucio had previous convictions for two traffic offenses for which he was supervised, but did not have a violent criminal history.

He was due back in court on February 16.

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Nightclubs

The Metro nightclub site will become a self-storage center | Jax Daily Record | Jacksonville Daily Record

The closed Metro Entertainment Complex in Riverside is being considered for redevelopment into the Metro Self Storage project.

A city request shows the removal of the former gay nightclub, which closed in August 2021.

The city has issued a Mobility Fee Calculation Certificate for Jacksonville-based Atlantic Self Storage to develop a 150,000-square-foot, four-story facility on 3.43 acres at 859 Willow Branch Ave.

Matthews Design Group of St. Augustine is the agent.

Through Riverside Avondale Atlantic Service LLC, Atlantic Self Storage purchased the property Sept. 1 for $1.85 million among four deeds.

Atlantic Self Storage operates 51 facilities in northeast Florida, according to AtlanticSelfStorage.com.

Jerald C. Rosenberg and Arnold J. Michaels have sold the gated Metro Entertainment Complex property for $1.85 million.

Holidays of Jacksonville Inc. and Holidays of Jacksonville LLC, led by Arnold J. Michaels and Jerald C. Rosenberg, sold the property, including the building, parking lot and vacant land,

The 16,319 square foot nightclub building was built in 1941.

On August 24, Daily Record partner News4Jax.com reported that Metro Entertainment Complex owner Jerry Rosenberg announced that the nightclub would be closing this weekend.

The site said Rosenberg announced the closure of the nightclub, which had served the LGBTQ+ community for 28 years.

Rosenberg said the nightclub has been hit hard due to the pandemic.

“AJ and I would like to thank everyone who has supported Metro over the years,” Rosenberg said in the report.

“We have been the proud owners for 15 of the 28 years. It was an incredible experience. We have the most wonderful staff and friends behind us since day one. The pandemic hit us really hard, being so closed last year,” Rosenberg said.

“We have the opportunity to sell the buildings and land to a developer.”

Rosenberg also teased that a new location may open soon.

He said he was working with some key employees to partner with Metro’s move “to a new, smaller, brighter location in the community.”

Rosenberg said on January 22 that he had not chosen a new location. “We are working on it,” he said.

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Bars

Shots fired downtown on Meridian


INDIANAPOLIS – The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department is investigating after shots were fired in a downtown parking lot early Monday.

Police were called to block 200 S. Meridian Street just after 1:40 a.m. to report a fight inside a bar. Officers say the fighting moved outside and one person fired shots in a parking lot.

Several cars had shattered windows, but investigators say they cannot say for sure if they were shattered by the gunfire.

No one was injured in the incident.

“It was unusual for us to have problems. We had no problems on New Years Eve, New Years Day… we had no problems this weekend until tonight, ”said Kerry Buckner, Public Information Officer at the IMPD.

“You can never predict when it’s going to happen. ”

Buckner says several bars were closed early as a precaution.

Police said a potential suspect was seen leaving the area in a blue Chevrolet. Investigators will look at cameras downtown for more information.


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Nightclubs

The police put an end to a big fight in front of the Modesto nightclub. 5 outfits


A big brawl in the parking lot of a Modesto nightclub early Sunday resulted in five arrests, police said.

Shortly before 1 a.m., police broke up the scuffle involving two groups of people – around 30 in total – which spilled out from the Crocodiles nightclub on Prescott Road near Briggsmore Avenue, Lt. font Steve Stanfield.

There were reports of several shots being fired, he said, but apparently no one was hit. Based on witness statements, the shots were fired into the air, he said. No weapons were recovered, Stanfield said.

According to a summary of the incident, one person was beaten in the scuffle and had to be taken to hospital for treatment, the lieutenant said.

One of those arrested was detained for negligently firing a firearm and resisting arrest. Two other people who remained in custody later Sunday morning could face charges of resisting arrest and fighting in public, according to the Online Reservation Journal.

Stanfield said four people were arrested without incident on suspicion of fighting in public and refusing to disperse, but police had to use force to take the fifth into custody. He did not have details on the use of force.

When asked if this suspect needed medical treatment, he replied, “We always provide medical aid for any force we use,” but he had no information on injuries, if any. , suffered by the person.

Deke has been an editor and reporter for The Modesto Bee since 1995. He currently reports on current affairs, education and human interest. A graduate of Beyer High, he studied geology and journalism at UC Davis and CSU Sacramento.


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Restaurants

Tell restaurants what you want DC Dining to look and taste like in 2022


The hotel industry is still in recovery mode, especially since few establishments have been restored by the Restaurant Revitalization Fund. Restaurant owners also continue to face a staffing crisis that is more of a labor movement than a labor shortage. And some chefs and bartenders still can’t find the ingredients or equipment they need to be successful due to supply chain challenges.

But the folks behind DC’s restaurants and bars are hoping to bounce back in 2022 and remind diners why living and eating here is so special.

As restaurants and bars reinvent themselves in the second year of the pandemic, we’d love to hear from you, dear fellow: what more or less would you like to see at local establishments in the New Year? How else would you like to see restaurant meals in Washington change in 2022?

If you have any ideas, please complete the open survey below in Friday December 10 at 9 a.m. Choose what interests you most and save the entries for 150 words or less. We will post as many responses as possible for everyone to read.

Need more than one invite? Examples of topics might include: fixed-price versus a la carte menus, drink offerings, neighborhoods, tips and service charges, technology, reservations, seat types, ingredients, accessibility, ownership fairness, style of service, take out and delivery, music and entertainment, safety and security, dress codes, happy hour promotions, parking lot and streets.

“Glimmer Shimmer Sparkle Shine” by caruba is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0


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Nightclubs

Rugby club bar will not function as a nightclub, says woman who hired him to give back to community


A rugby club that is said to be “the absolute hub of the community” has a new premises license, despite a resident’s concerns about noise and anti-social behavior.

Meinir Thomas told a Carmarthenshire licensing subcommittee that she and her husband David took the rental from Llandybie RFC to give something back to the community.

She said they were familiar with the village and felt they had a good understanding of the impact of the business on local residents.

Ms Thomas told the committee that, with that in mind, they had requested that the license hours be reduced from what is now.

Read more stories about Carmarthenshire

She said the club wouldn’t be for late night drinking and refuted a suggestion from a resident living across the street – Juliette Fane – that it would be more like a nightclub.

Ms Thomas spoke on two occasions in October that had sparked Miss Fane’s concerns – the first a wake, the second a Halloween party.

Miss Fane said she sympathized with the circumstances surrounding the wake, but said she could hear chants from inside the club in her living room and more noise from the parking lot outside.

Late at the Halloween event, Miss Fane said she witnessed screaming, screaming, shoving and fighting in the parking lot.

“No one at the club seemed to come out to stop him and ask for the noise to be reduced,” she said.

“When the police arrived, it took about 10 more minutes for it to calm down.”



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Miss Fane said she felt the license hours requested were “ridiculous” for such a built-up area, especially since there were residents in poor health or with very young children.

“I’m not against people having fun,” she said. “What I’m against is when it interrupts other people’s lives.”

Ms Thomas said the funeral was the largest the village had ever seen and that she had told several residents about it in advance. She said the bar was closed “at a specific time” and that she had helped organize taxis for customers between 10:45 pm and 11:15 pm.

“The whole hall was closed at 11:30 pm,” she said.

She said the Halloween party incident was a domestic incident, with one of the people allegedly involved arriving outside the club just before kick-off.

Ms Thomas said that she and her husband, after being made aware of an altercation in the parking lot, went out to see what was going on, despite the fact that they were both in Halloween costumes.

She said that when the police arrived, she asked the bar staff to stop serving alcohol.

“The whole incident from start to finish did not last more than 30 minutes,” she said.

Ms Thomas said the club had been at its Woodfield Road location since 1964 and was the absolute center of the community.

The club’s license meant that only club members and bona fide guests could drink there. The new license means it is open to all members of the public.

Speaking in favor of the demand, Llandybie adviser Dai Nicholas said the alcohol supply was a key revenue driver for the club, which had attracted many young rugby players to its ranks over the years. years.

Dyfed-Powys police did not oppose the license application, provided several conditions were met, and after consulting with a lawyer, the licensing subcommittee granted it.

The new license has a condition that no alcohol can be consumed outside after 10:30 p.m.

The Thomases will also install signs reminding customers to limit noise when leaving the premises and will offer residents a means of contacting them in the event of a problem.


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Cafes

Kent Café binds those recovering from drug addiction: “It becomes a family”

KENT – October 23 was a very special day for resident Brian Verrilli. It marked her first sobriety anniversary.

Within a year, Verilli’s life changed completely. He has new hobbies, a new home, and a new job at the home front of Wilson’s Bakery & Cafe, which opened in August.

Wilson’s, which is owned by Kent’s High Watch Recovery Center, only employs those recovering from an addiction disorder – from chefs to bakers to baristas.

“We reach out to people in the recovery community, many of whom are High Watch alumni, and they become the backbone of our employee base,” said Jason Perillo, Director of Marketing at High Watch. , a residential treatment center for inpatients. drugs and alcohol which opened in 1939.

Wilson’s was named after the late Bill Wilson, founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, the High Watch program is founded on the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous, and Wilson – who founded AA in the late 1930s – was on the first council. of High Watch in 1939.

Aside from the usual bond between coworkers, Perillo said High Watch employees tend to feel particularly close to each other because they have the common bond of addiction – and recovery.

“It’s a small recovery community so it becomes a family,” he said, adding that they were developing strong bonds. “When you yourself are in recovery and working with people in recovery, it is easier to be successful in your recovery because you have this support network around you at work. “

He said unlike many other restaurants that have had staff issues, Wilson’s, with 20 employees, is holding up.

“We haven’t had a hard time finding great employees, but at the same time we’ve been facing the same challenges that the rest of the restaurant world has been facing for over a year when it comes to hiring,” Perillo said. .

Since Wilson’s opening, Perillo said one of the nicest reactions the company has had so far has been the strong support from the community.

“We were a little worried that the stigma of recovery might just pull people away and the opposite happened and the community of Kent really embarrassed Wilson,” he said.

He added that Wilson’s was “packed” for lunch every day, he said, receiving 400 to 500 customers a day from Friday to Sunday.

“You can’t sit down for lunch,” Perillo said. “We are under attack all the time.”

The High Watch culinary team, in conjunction with Wilson’s management team, developed the menu. During the first month of opening the business, she only served her own employees.

“We did this a – to make sure we were doing it right and b – to test the menu to see what worked and what didn’t,” Perillo said.

The best seller on the menu is the Build-Your-Own-Breakfast Sandwich, said Perillo.

Salads include eggplant, tomatoes, pickled green beans and Brussels sprouts. The sandwiches include prime rib, roast chicken with herbs, prosciutto and parmesan.

The cafe can seat 15 people in total and has three tables outside.

The idea of ​​creating a place like Wilson’s came about as a way to help complete the program.

“We, as a company, felt it was the right thing to do,” said Perillo. “Our guests are only with us for a while and one of the things we believe very strongly in is giving them the tools necessary for a successful recovery after leaving High Watch. One of the things we wanted to do was provide opportunities for skill and career development, and Wilson was a natural fit for that goal.

The story of a guest

Verrilli was the first employee hired by Wilson’s when it opened.

He works full time at Wilson at the front of the house, having previously worked in the kitchen at High Watch.

At 25, he has already been through a lot.

“I started smoking weed and using drugs when I was 13,” said Verrilli, who grew up in Southington. “I always wanted to be out of my head so I didn’t have to deal with emotions. I wanted to numb everything for quite a long time.

Over time, Verrilli became more and more addicted to his habit and also developed a drinking problem.

Things went downhill from there.

“When me and an ex-girlfriend broke up I didn’t care anymore. I thought my future was destroyed,” he said. “I dove pretty deep into opiates and fentanyl . “

Although he worked at a “pretty nice” construction site, he said, no matter how much he was paid, he still couldn’t keep up with his habit.

“It got to the point where I was so addicted to it that I thought there was no way out,” he said. “I thought this was the way I would live for the rest of my life. I didn’t know there was a way to get sober.

After two suicide attempts, he had planned the third, when he made a phone call that would change his life.

“I was about to go park my car and try to kill myself again by deliberately overdosing,” he said.

But then he took a different path – and never looked back.

“I was in a Home Depot parking lot and pulled over. I called High Watch, ”he said, adding that his mother had sent him a brochure about the facility several months earlier.

High Watch picked him up a few days later.

“I left my house for Halloween rehab and stayed there for 57 days,” Verrilli said. “I left the day after Christmas.

He said the only way to get sober is to really want it.

“No one is going to get sober if they are doing it for someone else,” he said. “You have to do it only for yourself. “

Now he wants to give back.

“My goal is to be able to work to help others in any way I can,” said Verrilli. “I’m doing my first door job at Wilson’s, trying as much as possible here to help others.”

Recently, Verrilli became an entrepreneur. He makes and sells tie and dye shirts. Her Instagram is Dyin’Brianco.

He said he felt he had lived separate lives – one in the past and one now – “and the one now is beyond your wildest dreams,” he said. “From this rocky bottom where I was, until now. It’s unreal.

“There is a way out,” added Verrilli.

Wilson’s by High Watch, 10 N. Main St., is open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday through Monday.

Reservations are not required. Take-out meals are available. For more information visit wilsonsbyhighwatch.com

or call 959-300-0080.

[email protected] 203-948-9802.

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Bars

An ode to Eddie’s Place, one of Miami’s oldest dive bars


Eddie’s Place isn’t your average Miami watering hole.

Located west of the Florida International University campus in Lord’s Plaza Mall on SW Eighth Street, Eddie’s shares a parking lot with a pharmacy, bakery, and dry cleaner. It doesn’t serve any food, have a fancy cocktail menu, or discount drink promotions to attract customers on weekdays.

Over the years, however, the small space has hosted several weddings and at least one funeral.

Like a magical town Cheers, customers here are regulars in every sense of the word, returning several days a week to enjoy a no-frills pub experience. As with any fancy dive bar, this is the kind of establishment where everyone knows your name – and your business too.

And this weekend, Nov. 13, the establishment will celebrate its 50th anniversary, according to owner-operator Eddie Sarussi, which would not be possible without his founding team: his parents.

In 1971, Wanda and Eddie Sarussi, Sr., founder of Sarussi Subs, opened their first partnership business. At the time, Eddie Sr. had just sold the sandwich shop and his wife was eager to open something for her.

“Everyone knows my last name these days – for a place that’s now more famous than my parents’ bar,” says Eddie Jr. New times. “But that was what they really wanted to do.”

The young couple chose an independent building in the far west of Miami-Dade. To this day, the bar continues to operate at the same location. Over the years, the Sarussi have seen the metropolitan area expand around them, including the mall where they reside.

Click to enlarge Eddie's Place Co-Founder Wanda Sarussi and Son Eddie Sarussi, Jr. - PHOTO COURTESY OF EDDIE'S PLACE

Eddie’s Place co-founder Wanda Sarussi and her son Eddie Sarussi, Jr.

Photo courtesy of Eddie’s Place

“Back then there was nothing here after the freeway – no commercial buildings, no businesses and certainly no bars,” recalls Eddie Jr., whose father died two years after the opening of the bar. “But it was my mother’s dream.”

Eddie, a 51-year-old day software developer, says he spent his childhood in one of his mother’s three Miami bars. While the others – Blue Moon and Coral Gate – are now closed, Eddie’s Place has stood the test of time.

Now, five years after Wanda’s death and almost two years after the pandemic began, Eddie is happy to see his parents’ bar remain a popular destination.

“I got involved out of necessity, and I guess I fell in love with it myself,” he says. “My mom did everything to keep this place alive for so long, I couldn’t let this legacy end. Now here we are, celebrating five decades in Miami.”

One of the few old-fashioned dive bars in the county, it’s also – no coincidence – still the place where regulars go for cheap drinks, throw darts, shoot pool and relax.

“It’s always the place where everyone knows the bartender’s name, and the bartenders know their names. It’s just a great down-to-earth place where you come as you are,” says Eddie. “Nothing has changed about that, and that’s what keeps me going.”

Click to enlarge Guests shoot free pool on Sundays at Eddie's Place.  - PHOTO COURTESY OF EDDIE'S PLACE

Guests shoot free pool on Sundays at Eddie’s Place.

Photo courtesy of Eddie’s Place

He is right. Not much has changed about Eddie’s Place.

Not only does the establishment still not serve food, but a few dollars will still get you a vodka cocktail or a bottled beer. Eddie’s still sports the same U-shaped bar with a padded faux leather edge that invites you to rest your elbows for multiple laps. And, as it has been since the early 90s, it’s still open until 5 a.m. every day.

Some things, of course, have changed. Since COVID-19, the bar has officially gone non-smoking.

And the demographics are changing too. The daytime crowd has given way to a nocturnal clientele. While locals continue to be a big part of the business, people in the industry now stumble around 3 a.m. from the mall, downtown, and a nearby Flanigan.

“And there’s karaoke,” Eddie adds.

Indeed, weekly events include a rowdy late-night karaoke that starts at 10 p.m. on Tuesday and Friday evenings, in which customers emboldened by alcohol keep guests entertained until the early hours of the morning.

There is also poker on Mondays, stand-up comedy on Wednesdays, beer pong on Thursdays, and free pool tables on Sundays.

That, and Eddie’s most popular pastime: good company chatting.

“These days, that’s what keeps me going,” Eddie days. “Eddie’s Place has always been, and still is, a really special place.”

Eddie’s place. 12606 SW Eighth St., Miami; 305-226-1421; facebook.com/eddiesplace1971. Open Monday to Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 5 a.m. and Thursday to Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 a.m.


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Nightclubs

Fargo nightclub liquor license sale gets conditional approval


The owner of the building, 518 Properties, owned by Tyler Brandt, aims to take over operations with an agreement to purchase the license from the club’s former owners.

Commissioners had previously revoked the license due to public safety concerns, including the shooting death of a club bouncer in a nearby parking lot in May.

518 Properties representative Dan Hicks said a management team was not yet in place. The plans call for keeping the same business concept.

“We think it’s an underserved area in the metro,” he said.

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The Fargo Liquor Control Board unanimously approved the conditional plan before forwarding it to the City Board.

The conditional clause was encouraging for Commissioner Dave Piepkorn, who also sits on the liquor board.

“I think it’s a good company, and with good ownership and management it’s a good addition to the community,” said Piepkorn. “But I think it’s very important that we know who the manager is… because I think it’s essential for future safety and success.”

Others questioned the lack of a comprehensive management plan.

“We have had (applicants for) liquor licenses presented to us in the past who wanted a liquor license, but we turned them down because they didn’t have a plan of the facility,” said Commissioner Tony Gehrig. “So we are bending over backwards for this… We shouldn’t be voting on this just yet.”

Commissioner John Strand noted that the contingency given to 518 properties matched the reason the commission did not allow the original owners to retain the liquor license.

“They didn’t have a leadership. They didn’t have a plan,” he said. “But now we’re back to square one. We have another candidate who doesn’t have a plan and doesn’t have a manager.”

Strand also said both parties to the liquor licensing deal had run-ins with the police over their files. However, Corey Schultz, the former license owner, has had a more recent and negative interaction with the police, Piepkorn said.

Police chief David Zibolski echoed Piepkorn and added that the charges against the new director several years ago have been dropped.

“An arrest probably should not even have been made in this case,” he said.

After a lengthy discussion, Commissioners approved the conditional sale by a 3-2 vote with Commissioner Arlette Preston, Mayor Tim Mahoney and Piepkorn in favor. Strand and Gehrig voted against approval.

Once the management team is in place and the business concept is firm, the beverage license transfer will come back to the Liquor Control Board and Municipal Commission for final approval.


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Nightclubs

Greenville: a dead man outside the nightclub


One person died after an early morning shooting outside a nightclub in Greenville, according to the Greenville County Coroner’s Office. two gunshot victims were found and taken to hospital, where one later died. The coroner identified the victim as Torri Adaryl Pone, 27, of Greenville. Coroner Parks Evans said Pone was involved in an altercation with another person in the parking lot. They said he was taken to the hospital where he died just after 2 a.m. The cause and mode of death were not disclosed. Police say they have a suspect in custody.

One person has died after an early morning shooting outside a nightclub in Greenville, according to the Greenville County Coroner’s Office.

(Video above: morning headlines)

Police said they were called to “Reign” on South Pleasantburg Drive around 1 a.m. Monday.

They said two gunshot victims were found and taken to hospital, where one of them later died.

The coroner identified the victim as Torri Adaryl Pone, 27, of Greenville.

Coroner Parks Evans said Pone was involved in an altercation with another person in the parking lot. They said he was taken to the hospital where he died just after 2 a.m.

The cause and mode of death were not disclosed.

Police say they have a suspect in custody.


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Nightclubs

2 Arrested in connection with a homicide outside the Tulsa nightclub


Two men were arrested outside a nightclub after their alleged role in the death of a man early Sunday morning.

Officers were dispatched to the scene shortly before 3 a.m. Sunday near the intersection of South Sheridan Road and East 21st Street.

Tulsa police said the men, identified as Jose Ledesma-Hernandez and Ramon De Jesus Garcia-Ibarra, were among the few who refused to leave the club and were engaged in a confrontation.

The club owner tried to stop the fight and asked the men to leave the club parking lot. The men then decided to redirect their anger to the club owner and started assaulting him.

Authorities said the men started kicking him as he fell to the ground. Security guards were trying to break the scene between the men and the club owner. A suspect’s vehicle then rushed towards one of the security guards who jumped briskly onto the hood of the car, avoiding injury. The vehicle left the scene.

During this time, the owner went into cardiac arrest, was taken to a local hospital and later died there.

At the scene, several witnesses reported the suspicious vehicle to officers as it was driving along East 21st Street. The authorities were able to arrest the men and arrested them.

During the interview process, officers said Garcia-Ibarra was identified as one of the two men who assaulted the owner. The other man is an unknown man who is still pending at this time. Ledesma-Hernandez was identified as the man who struck the security guard with the vehicle.


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Cafes

Niagara Cafe’s recipe for success

BUFFALO, NY (WKBW) – Niagara Cafè has served the downtown Buffalo community for almost 30 years.

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, 7ABC is digging into the mouth watering staple on the west side of Buffalo. The station visited the restaurant to see if they would reveal their recipe for success.

“When this place went up for sale it[Maria’s husband] said ‘I think we’re going to teach Buffalo how to eat rice and beans and go on a bigger scale!’ It was perfect: the building, the parking lot. Right in the center of the community, ”recalls Maria Hernandez, co-owner of Niagara Cafè.

On Niagara Street, in the heart of downtown Buffalo, is Queen City’s Niagara Cafè, owned by Maria Hernandez and her husband Raúl.

“Before, we had a grocery store and we always wanted to name it after the street. When we had the grocery store, he didn’t call it that. proximity to Niagara Falls too. “says Hernandez.” I wanted to include Niagara, instead of having a Spanish name that we’re very proud of, but we wanted to identify with the community, and Niagara Street was. “

The restaurant serves Buffalo’s better Puerto Rican food.

“The bestseller is roast chicken,” Hernandez said. “The rice, the roast pork, the marinated steak with onions. It is very appreciated with the sauce and the onions. It is very good.”

The popular restaurant draws customers from near and far to have a bite to eat in the house-style cafe.

“We’re proud of our community here. She’s embraced us for almost 30 years. And not just here, we have people coming from out of town, as far as California or Canada, wherever. either. They always say they have to go in and make a stop at Niagara Cafè before going home. It’s just a good feeling to hear that, “she said.

Don’t think you can make your own seasoning at home, because Hernandez says it’s Top secret!

She said, “We season our food with spices – island spices. It is not a hot food. It is not spicy. It just tastes great with the spices we have. We take great pride in the way we season our food and the taste has taken on. “

Hernandez told 7ABC that Niagara Cafè actually started out as a Puerto Rican pizza place.

“My husband has always been a person who imagines things and makes them happen. When this property went up for sale, we had already launched a satellite, say, we launched Puerto Rican Pizza just down the street. mixed with pizza and Puerto Rican food. It worked great but it was a very small place. “

However, Maria and her husband Raul eventually developed the successful business that it is today: 29 years later.

When asked what her recipe for success was, she replied:

“Oh! Never give up! He[Raul] always has a positive attitude. He says if you don’t take a risk you will never get there. Take a chance and see where it goes, and that’s what happened here, ”she explained. “We started from there. Thank goodness our pride and our community have made this such a good and very positive company. From there, it just wasn’t about looking back. “

While the pandemic has put a damper on many restaurants, Niagara Cafe has not been immune. The restaurant continued operations after three months and rebounded in revenue. However, indoor seating has been permanently removed from the restaurant.

Follow Niagara Café updates, here.
For more Hispanic Heritage Month stories from the 7ABC team, click here.

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Cafes

First Look: This New Lyncourt Cafe serves the heaviest pastry you’ve ever devoured

(In First look, we quickly pay a visit to a new restaurant or bar in central New York City to give readers an idea of ​​what to expect. Our food critics could possibly visit these places and give us their opinion, but we want to highlight the novelties in our region. If you know of a new place, send an email to [email protected] or call / text me on 315-382-1984. If I take your suggestion, I might just buy you a meal.)

****

Syracuse, NY – Over the past 22 years, Mike Bolognone has delivered premium coffee to hundreds of businesses in downtown New York City for his father’s distribution company. It makes sense that his first experience in the restaurant business was serving the perfect pastry to dip in this cafe.

The Koffee King Cafe opened its doors a few weeks ago at 3712 New Court Ave. in Lyncourt, in the building that once housed Bob’s Barkers’ brick-and-mortar hot dog stand. Mike and his wife, Rebekah, had been talking for years about opening a cafe that would serve him pastries, sandwiches and soups. Earlier this year he went to the office on Townline Road and noticed that the building was for sale.

Mike and Rebekah closed the property in April. They painted the entrance, built a catering counter using discarded wine barrels, and scraped years of grease off the kitchen equipment. While restoring the interior of the cafe, they opened an ice cream stand at the left front of the store on July 2. They serve milkshakes, floats and cones, using locally made Byrne Dairy hard ice cream.

The building is now fully open with five tables inside that can accommodate up to 18 indoor clients. They also have picnic tables in the outdoor patio and a drive-through window.

Café Koffee King in Lyncourt. Charlie Miller | [email protected]

Throughout the summer, Rebekah worked on perfecting her recipes for coffee. She’s developed a breakfast pizza, chocolate peanut butter banana bread, grilled sandwiches, and soups that fill the belly.

The signature dish here, however, is the Gooey Buns.

Mike grew up in Syracuse eating the sticky buns his grandmother made every weekend. Rebekah’s family side in southern New Jersey had their own cinnamon bun recipe passed down from her great-grandmother. Rebekah spent months mixing the two recipes together until she found the perfect blend.

“I’m in love with the product,” Mike said. “Seriously, these are special. They take so long to make, but it’s totally worth it in the end.

You might think that making sticky buns is nothing more than mixing flour, sugar, cinnamon and water and throwing them in an oven.

Think again.

It takes Samantha Kelly, their Managing Director and Head Pastry Chef, three hours to bake a batch of 30 to 48 buns each morning. “That’s why other people don’t make them,” Rebekah said. “It takes so long for the dough to rise that most people give up.”

The homemade dough recipe comes from Rebekah’s family side. Mike’s great-grandmother, Malvina, would put melted butter on the dough, under the cinnamon and sugar.

You must try …

Sticky buns ($ 3.19): A typical sticky bun from a bakery or supermarket weighs 2-3 ounces. Those at the Koffee King Cafe are anything but typical. I think I understood why they call them Gooey Buns here: the syrupy frosting thinks serves as a binder for the five rings of cinnamon dough rather than a thin, hard sugar frosting.

One of these 6 inch breakfast pastries weighs 9½ ounces, more if you order one with nut and / or cream cheese frosting. This baked yeast yeast dough is heavier than five scrambled eggs, and it’s way tastier.

You will need a large cup of their Paul de Lima medium roast coffee to wash it down. The coffee is fresh and complements the bun well without detracting from its flavor.

TRICK: Make sure you have a knife. These buns are so dense that without a fork, it’ll be like eating an extra-long fried pizza at the State Fair. This is a good thing.

First Look: Koffee King Café

The Gooey Buns are the signature of the Koffee King Cafe in Lyncourt. Charlie Miller | [email protected]

Sausage and Cream Cheese Soup ($ 4.99): Koffee King offers a creamy tomato soup and this tasty soup every day. It just happens to be Mike’s favorite. It’s better since Rebekah came up with the recipe.

The soup has a base of chicken broth with heavy cream and cream cheese. She adds diced onions, garlic and tomatoes before adding ground Italian Gianelli sausage and Parmesan cheese.

I used it as a dip for my fried bologna sandwich. The buttered bun absorbed the meat broth so well. It has proven to be the perfect comfort bowl for this time of year.

First Look: Koffee King Café

Sausage Cream Cheese Soup at the Koffee King Cafe in Lyncourt. Charlie Miller | [email protected]

Fried Bologna Sandwich ($ 5.99): This is one of the few restaurants in the area that serves such a sandwich, and that’s a shame. We’re not talking about a slice of Oscar Mayer’s lunch meat between two slices of Wonder Bread reheated in a microwave.

Mike fry seven thin slices of premium deli meats in hot vegetable oil while he toasts a buttery potato roll. Again, that’s what Malvina made her for lunch as a child. “It’s always been my favorite sandwich,” he says.

While Mike prefers his plain fried bologna, I had him smear black mustard on the meat. It also offers a slice of Colby-jack cheese.

First Look: Koffee King Café

Mike Bolognone makes a toasted bologna sandwich at the Koffee King Cafe in Lyncourt. Charlie Miller | [email protected]

Affogato ($ 4.49): This coffee-based Italian dessert is unlike anything you’ll find at Starbucks or a fancy cafe or ice cream parlor. It’s basically a coffee float.

Mike drops a thick scoop of vanilla ice cream into the bottom of a 20-ounce mug before filling it almost with roasted Paul de Lima coffee. He adds a dash of caramel syrup before garnishing it with a dollop of soft ice cream. It ends with a swirl of heavy whipped cream and a ring of hot caramel sauce.

The clear plastic cup looks like a drinking lava lamp as the soft serve ice cream slowly melts in the coffee. It’s THE perfect pick-me-up at the end of the afternoon. Sure, it’ll ruin your dinner, but the caffeine buzz fights a bad high of sugar to give you all kinds of energy.

First Look: Koffee King Café

Mike Bolognone creates an affogato at the Koffee King Cafe in Lyncourt. Charlie Miller | [email protected]

The details

The place: Café Koffee King, 3712 New Court Avenue, Syracuse. (315) 960-0006.

Hours: Monday to Saturday, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Closed Sunday. (They will close at 2 p.m. at the end of the ice season.)

Dress: Casual

Alcohol: No

Credit card? Yes

Eat in ? Yes

Go out: Yeah

Car park: Large parking lot.

MORE CNY FOOD

First Look: Let This New Italian Lakeland Market Do The Cooking And Become The Sunday Dinner Hero

More early glimpses in CNY

Hidden gems of CNY

Restaurant Reviews

Charlie miller find the best food, drink and entertainment in central New York City. Contact him at (315) 382-1984, or by email at [email protected]. You can also find him on Twitter @HoosierCuse.

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Nightclubs

Bangor nightclub murderer sentenced to 32 years for murder


A Bangor man was sentenced to 32 years in prison on Wednesday for the stabbing death of Demetrius Snow, 25, on February 1, 2020, in the parking lot of Half Acre nightclub on Harlow Street.

In May, a jury found Rayshaun Moore, 36, guilty of murder.

Moore denied killing the Bangor man, whom he knew. He claimed that another man who was in the parking lot that night took a knife from Moore and stabbed Snow.

Superior Court Judge William Anderson said that in deciding what sentence to impose, he considered Snow and others assaulted Moore earlier that evening in the same parking lot.

“I think what happened before is a very important factor in this conviction,” the judge said in imposing Moore’s sentence at the Penobscot Judicial Center.

The prosecution recommended a 48-year sentence while the defense urged the judge to impose a 25-year sentence.

Snow was stabbed seven times but died of a heart injury, Maine deputy chief medical examiner Dr Lisa Funte said during Moore’s spring trial.

Snow was taken to Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center where he was pronounced dead after 1 a.m. on February 1, 2020.

Moore offered his condolences to the Snow family on Wednesday and apologized for his role in the victim’s death.

Snow was one of 12 children and had moved to Maine in 2015 or 2016 from Rochester, New York.

Her mother and three of her sisters urged the judge to hand down a long sentence. Two of the sisters told Moore that they forgave him. The other said his brother would have turned 27 on Tuesday.

The victim’s mother, Sherri Snow, had just lost a daughter in a car crash six weeks before her son was murdered, she told Anderson.

“The last time I spoke to Demetrius was on my birthday, January 30, and he was killed on February 1,” she told the judge. “I want you to know, Rayshaun, that you took a brother, an uncle, a son, a nephew from our family.

“Your honor, I ask the maximum,” she continued. “It won’t bring my son back, but it will end me and my family.”

Moore moved to Maine in 2017 for a relationship, said his lawyer, Hunter Tzovarras of Bangor. The defendant worked in restaurants in Grand Bangor.

The lawyer released a video of Moore’s 15-year-old son asking for leniency from the judge.

“I really need my dad in my life,” said judge George Anthony Moore of Brockton, Massachusetts. “She is a very, very good person. He needs rehabilitation as a punishment.

Nightclub security cameras filmed the fight between Moore and Snow and the aftermath of the stabbing, but did not show who wielded the knife. The stabbing took place on a snow bank out of reach of the camera. Snow was able to get up and stagger before collapsing.

The prosecution argued that Moore’s murder of Snow was an act of revenge because earlier that evening Snow assaulted Moore in the Half Acre parking lot.

The defense claimed that Kevin Brogdon Sr., 29, of Bangor took Moore’s knife from him and stabbed Snow. Brogdon spoke during the trial and denied this. He had never seen or touched the murder weapon, he said.

Before the trial began, Moore rejected an offer that he would plead guilty to murder in exchange for a 38-year sentence, lawyers said.

Anderson allowed jurors to consider manslaughter as an alternative conviction to murder, but they rejected that option.

Moore risked between 25 years and life imprisonment. Had the jury found him guilty of manslaughter, Moore would have faced up to 30 years in prison.


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Bars

Maui man with 77 previous arrests back behind bars for reckless driving, DUI


HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – A Maui man with a long rap sheet has been arrested again following a chain of events over the weekend.

Marcus Ruggiero, 56, of Wailuku, Maui, is now behind bars, this time charged with negligent injuries, impaired driving, reckless endangerment and more.

According to Maui Police, early Saturday morning he was seen driving recklessly on the Lahaina Bypass. Officers were unable to stop her and called off a pursuit in the interest of public safety.

Just before 6 p.m., he was again seen driving in Wailuku town. There, an officer on leave saw Ruggiero colliding with a pedestrian jogging along the Honoapiilani highway. The officer stopped to assist the man from Waikapu, 27, as Ruggiero walked away without rescuing.

Maui Police said the jogger suffered non-life threatening injuries and was taken to hospital for treatment.

The chain of events continued as Ruggiero made his way to Paia via Hana Highway, and was later found in the Makena area.

In the parking lot at La Pérouse Bay, police said he struck another parked vehicle. It was then that the police were able to surround him and take him into custody. At the time, police said Ruggiero allegedly showed signs of impairment.

He was charged with 12 additional offenses as a result of the series of events. Police examined his file and found that he had made 77 arrests and 58 convictions. Of these, 15 concerned felonies, 24 misdemeanors and 19 minor misdemeanors.

During his most recent arrest, MPD said he was on bail for attempted murder, driving without a license, reckless driving and resisting stop orders.

His bond has been revoked and is now set at $ 264,000. He is still being held at the Wailuku Police Station.

“Mr. Ruggiero’s arrest was a collaborative effort of all the Patrol Districts, Lahaina, Wailuku and Kihei. The fact that no one has been killed by Mr. Ruggiero yet is nothing short of a miracle, ”said Lieutenant Hankins, MPD traffic commander.

Copyright 2021 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.


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Nightclubs

Liquor license suspended for New Haven nightclub after massive brawl and shootout – NBC Connecticut


The Consumer Protection Department issued a liquor license suspension for a New Haven nightclub after a major brawl and shooting Thursday.

Officials said Terminal 110, located on Sargent Drive, received the summary suspension after a police dismissal over events that occurred in the wee hours of September 23.

DCP officials said Terminal 110 was the scene of a major brawl and shootout in which at least one person was shot and three shots were fired. Officials say the incident resembles another shooting incident that occurred earlier this month when 27 assorted used bullet casings, one live bullet and two bullet fragments were found around the club’s parking lot.

Police chief Renee Dominguez said officers working at the nightclub heard several gunshots upon release on September 5. They were unable to locate any suspects due to the large crowd. However, they noticed that three cars in the club parking lot had been hit. by bullets, according to Dominguez.

In the incident on September 23, an officer working at the club was alerted by a bouncer that a big brawl was taking place inside. After everyone was evacuated, three gunshots were heard coming from the parking lot, police said.

A person involved in the shooting who fled the scene in a vehicle was ultimately taken into custody after a brief foot chase. The man appeared to be suffering from a gunshot wound in the groin and was taken to hospital with injuries where he was listed in stable condition, police said.

Another man suspected of being involved in the shooting has not been located by police. Officials said the manager of Terminal 110 had agreed to provide surveillance footage of the shooting.

“I am grateful that the New Haven Police Department brought this matter to my attention and I believe this immediate suspension is justified and necessary to remedy this very serious situation,” said DCP Commissioner Michelle H. Seagull , in a press release. “The occurrence of two shootings at this site in a few weeks is a huge threat to public safety and highlights the need for better control of the site by our licensees. People should feel safe entering any facility that holds one of our licenses. “

The nightclub will not be allowed to serve alcohol until further notice.


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Bars

The Citrus Heights couple’s cigar bar brings culture and conviviality


Cuban culture is flourishing in Citrus Heights, thanks to a couple and their cigar shop, which brought them together. It’s a little corner of Havana inside Casillas Cigars where they have freshly rolled cigars, salsa, and a vibrant Cuban atmosphere. This family owned and operated business manufactures everything it sells. Owners Pierre and Ana Perales love to share their culture with guests. love has begun. Pierre remembers the day very well. He called it love at first sight. “I remember everything. I remember who was in the room when she walked in, what she was wearing, what I was wearing, where she was, everything she said,” Pierre said. “From that point on, we got married at that point.” The two encounters at the cigar store were entirely coincidental. Ana was driving on Madison Avenue. She said she almost had an accident and swerved, braking and turning in the parking lot where the store was located. She walked in and Pierre started offering her cigars, but said she told him she had no interest in cigars at all – she was looking for something Cuban after moving to the area. New Orleans. After their first meeting, she said “the rest is history”. “I definitely found what I was looking for!” Ana said, referring to her search for something Cuban. Fifteen years and two children later, the Perales family proudly carry on their family tradition of rolling fresh cigars. Pierre says they use tobacco grown in the Dominican Republic. Every cigar they sell is a tradition passed down to Pierre from his father, who escaped from a Cuban concentration camp to find freedom in America. decades of oppression, 60 years of communist control. And again, we have my parents who escaped in 1968, escaped from a communist concentration camp. My dad dived in Guantanamo Bay, swam two miles where the Marines pulled him out of the water. Talk about a heartbreaking story. And I see my dad every day of my life and run this operation with him. With him here in the family business. “Casillas Cigars offers over 36 types of fresh hand-rolled cigars, but for customers and those who work there, it’s more than just a cigar store. It’s a community meeting place where people from all walks of life and all cultures meet. Pierre said a friend of his described his cigar shop as “by people, by people and for people.” Said if it wasn’t for this place, I don’t know what I would have done to myself. I don’t know what would happen because they were going through a divorce or a rough time, grief or a professional transition “Pierre said. Pierre and Ana said that sharing cigars with their family and friends has always been a spiritual part of their heritage. Comparing smoking and sharing a cigar to breaking bread, Peter said it is a tradition that works in times of peace and war, as well as in times of victory and sorrow. Culturally, Ana said it’s a spiritual practice, a way people were able to communicate with the gods, the smoke carrying wishes and prayers to them. The couple are now taking their Cuban culture on the road to parties and events. They have an entertainment service called “Havana Nights”, where they bring in dancers, teach guests salsa dancing, and roll them fresh cigars. It’s just another way the Perales leave their mark on the community and keep their family traditions alive. “There aren’t a lot of Cubans here in California,” Ana said. “And it’s really nice because we feel like we can leave our mark and we can leave our legacy here as a Cuban. Every day we strive to spread more of our, our culture, through the dance and art because that’s what’s in our blood. It’s what’s in our history. So we love to share this with other people. “Casillas Cigars is open 7 days a week, located at 7435 Madison Ave. at Citrus Heights. You can book a “Havana Nights” event online.

Cuban culture is flourishing in Citrus Heights, thanks to a couple and their cigar shop, which brought them together.

It’s a little corner of Havana inside Casillas Cigars where they have freshly rolled cigars, salsa, and a vibrant Cuban atmosphere. This family owned and operated business manufactures everything it sells.

Owners Pierre and Ana Perales love to share their culture with guests.

“Our Cuban culture is everything,” Ana said.

The cigar store, where Ana and Pierre met, is also the place where their love began.

Pierre remembers the day very well. He called it love at first sight.

“I remember everything. I remember who was in the room when she walked in, what she was wearing, what I was wearing, where she was, everything she said,” Pierre said. “From that point on, we got married at that point.”

The two encounters at the cigar store were entirely coincidental. Ana was driving on Madison Avenue. She said she almost had an accident and swerved, braking and entering the parking lot where the store was located.

She walked in and Pierre started offering her cigars, but said she told him she wasn’t interested in cigars at all – she was looking for something Cuban that had just moved from Nova Scotia. Orleans in the region. After their first meeting, she said “the rest is history”.

“I definitely found what I was looking for!” Ana said, referring to her search for something Cuban.

Fifteen years and two children later, the Perales family proudly carry on their family tradition of rolling fresh cigars. Pierre says they use tobacco grown in the Dominican Republic.

Rolled in every cigar they sell is a tradition passed down to Pierre from his father, who escaped from a Cuban concentration camp to find freedom in America.

“We come from many years and decades of oppression, 60 years of communist control. And again, we have my parents who escaped in 1968, escaped from a communist concentration camp. My father dove in the bay. from Guantanamo, swam two miles where the Marines pulled him out of the water. Talk about a heartbreaking story. And I see my dad every day of my life and run this operation with him. With him here in the family business. “

Casillas Cigars offers over 36 types of fresh hand-rolled cigars, but for customers and those who work there, it’s more than just a cigar shop. It is a community meeting place where people from all walks of life and all cultures come together.

Pierre said a friend of his described his cigar shop as “by the people, by the people and for the people”.

“The guys came back years later and said if it hadn’t been for this place I don’t know what I would have done to myself. I don’t know what would happen because they were going through a divorce or a difficult time, grief or a job transition, ”said Pierre.

Pierre and Ana have said that sharing cigars with their family and friends has historically been part of their spiritual heritage. Comparing smoking and sharing a bread-breaking cigar, Peter said it is a tradition that works in times of peace and war, as well as in times of victory and sorrow.

From a cultural perspective, Ana said it was a spiritual practice, a means by which people could communicate with the gods, the smoke bringing them wishes and prayers.

The couple are now taking their Cuban culture on the road to parties and events. They have an entertainment service called “Havana Nights”, where they bring in dancers, teach guests salsa dancing, and roll them fresh cigars.

It’s just another way the Perales leave their mark on the community and keep their family traditions alive.

“There aren’t a lot of Cubans here in California,” Ana said. “And it’s really nice because we feel like we can leave our mark and we can leave our legacy here as a Cuban. Every day we strive to spread more of our, our culture, through the dance and art because that’s what’s in our blood. It’s what’s in our story. So we love to share that with other people. “

Casillas Cigars is open 7 days a week, located at 7435 Madison Ave. at Citrus Heights. You can book a “Havana Nights” event online.


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Restaurants

Dave’s Hot Chicken opens three restaurants


Dave ‘s Hot Chicken, the mind-blowing late-night pop-up that turns into a hot chicken sensation, today announced the grand opening of three new locations, each opening this Friday, September 24, continuing its expansion and goal of bringing the most coveted hot chicken to communities across the county.

The company’s first location in Houston, and the second in the state of Texas, is located at 12161 Westheimer and will be open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to midnight Friday through Sunday. Dave Hot Chicken’s Houston location has drive-thru and ceilings nearly 20 feet high, with outdoor seating as well.

The company’s first site in Northern California, in Santa Rosa, is located at 2240 Mendocino Ave., and will be open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., seven days a week. The Santa Rosa Restaurant has a generous outdoor dining area, as well as custom interior graphics that reinforce the brand’s commitment to delivering irresistible ‘out of this world’ hot chicken.

Dave’s Hot Chicken’s second restaurant in California is located in Santa Ana at 3332 South Bristol St. Ana’s Firefighter Uniform. The restaurant will be open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight.

The quick and casual concept specializes in hot chicken fillets and sliders, as well as sides of house kale salad, creamy mac and cheese, and crispy fries. Offered in seven different spice levels ranging from No Spice to Reaper (which requires a signed waiver for those who dare), each hand-breaded, juicy piece of chicken uses a proprietary spice blend designed specifically for its heat level. . The brand started a few years ago as a pop-up parking lot and has drawn lines around the block, with rave reviews from its fanatic Instagram followers.

“Dave’s hot chicken will blow your mind!” Every offering is tangy, juicy and spicy, ”says Bill Phelps, CEO of Dave’s Hot Chicken. “Our founders started Dave’s as a pop-up restaurant in a Hollywood parking lot with a portable fryer and picnic tables in their backyard just three years ago. We are excited to open these new locations in California and Houston! “

The news and information presented in this press release has not been corroborated by QSR, Food News Media or Journalistic, Inc.


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Bars

30 years after murder, family tries to keep killer behind bars


Rocky River graduate Melissa Herstrum was killed in 1992 by University of Toledo policeman Jeffrey Hodge. Now 52, ​​Hodge is on parole.

ROCKY RIVER, Ohio – It’s just too hard to list all the ways those close to Melissa Anne Herstrum missed her. But on a cold morning in Rocky River, we sat down with Melissa’s sister, Cindy Herstrum-Clark, and Melissa’s close friend, TJ McManamon, so they could give it a try.

“I missed her contagious laugh and her outlook on life so much,” her sister Cindy told us. “She was so full of life and spirit and her personality was just contagious. I missed the way she celebrated the holidays and how much she loved family time and all of those things.”

“Melissa was such a great friend. She was such a loving soul. She was wonderful to be around: happy, joyful… I miss her every day, she’s not here. It’s been 30 years and she is truly a fighting, ”TJ McManamon said.

In January 1992, the life of their beloved Melissa was stolen from him by the police officer of the University of Toledo, Jeffrey Hodge. Hodge arrested Melissa, drove her to a parking lot away from campus, then killed her, leaving her body to freeze on the ground.

“What is going on has really changed us all. It has changed everything … the way we look at life, the way we treat people … it’s been very difficult to function at times,” TJ said. .

“It’s a hole in my parents’ heart. It’s a hole in my heart. It’s all the life we ​​couldn’t share with her because she was only 19 years old,” Cindy said.

They had to deal with 30 years of pain, which is now magnified at the thought of her killer being released.

“He’s on parole. But he was sentenced to a life sentence of 30 to life,” Cindy said.

Thirty in life, but it’s only been 29 years. And, every year, an excruciating reminder of how she was taken.

“He shot him 14 times at close range and his clothes were partially removed. He wanted to see the impact of the bullets, and I have to relive all of these things, but they never leave my memory anyway. He’s dangerous. “said Cindy, fighting back tears.

But it wasn’t just the way he had killed her. It’s what he did next that thrills Melissa’s family to this day.

“He wanted to be at the autopsy and witnessed the autopsy. He was also on guard outside the sorority house. He found the body himself, him and his partner. staged this whole scene, ”TJ said.

How could a killer potentially be released? In a statement, Ohio Department of Corrections spokeswoman JoEllen Smith said in part:

“He is eligible for his first hearing because he has served his 30 years, minus 430 days in prison.

“He’s saved 30% of his time, so he’s eligible for parole after serving 70% of his minimum sentence.”

Meanwhile, Melissa’s family say he’s a monster, unable to change.

“He has passed every psychological test a police officer takes. And just as it was programmed in quotes at Marion Correctional Facility, how can a human be able to commit such a violent crime?” said Cindy.

“There was no remorse back then, there isn’t now, and there never will be,” TJ said.

Melissa’s former classmates at Rocky River High School have launched a campaign and website to keep Hodge in jail.

“The best thing we can do is send letters. We can write to the governor, we can write to the parole board,” TJ said.

But for Cindy and her parents, they themselves feel imprisoned, forever tortured by the images of their Melissa.

“I really can’t understand how my parents would need to go through this for a few more years, again, just to come back and relive those feelings. We’re trying to suppress. But I can’t forget. I can’t forget to. what she looked like lying there in the coffin. I can’t forget it. I won’t forget it. I don’t want to forget his memory, but I won’t forget what he did. rest of my life making sure he can. He stays where he needs to stay, “Cindy said.

To visit Melissaforever.com, click HERE.

If you would like to write a letter about Jeffrey Hodge, see below:

Ohio Parole Board
Ref: Jeffrey Hodge [A275835]
4545 Fisher Road, Suite D
Columbus, Ohio 43228

If you want to send an email, you can send it here:

[email protected]
Subject: Jeffrey Hodge [A275835]

More stories from Lindsay Buckingham:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HMCZK4Nqus


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Cafes

The fears of Hereford coffee after the refusal of the trade license of the pavement

A POPULAR Hereford cafe will have to downsize after learning it can no longer have outside seating.

Co-owners of JJ and Little Dots in Hereford’s Bridge Street made the decision to use the coronavirus pavement licensing program this year after the old bridge was closed to traffic during the pandemic.

And the pair say the program has been a big success, with many patrons on the warmer days choosing to sit outside the cafe and soak up the sun even after the social distancing restrictions were removed.

But now they’ve been told they won’t be able to renew their pavement permits as the old bridge is about to reopen to traffic, which co-owner Karen Barnett says will mean lay off staff.

“We paid for 10 tables and chairs during the pandemic, and we will also have to lay off staff,” she said.

“The purpose of closing the bridge was to try and get people to ride bikes. They took away the parking lot and then said we could have outside seats if we paid for it, so we paid and bought seats and at no point did they say that would make it a one-time deal.

“We paid £ 100 for the license, then had to pay hundreds of pounds for the seats and employed four more people to handle the extra capacity. We also got another terminal, which we pay monthly, and a new iPad for the order.

“The bridge is opening now and we’re going to have to get rid of the staff because I won’t be able to pay them if we lose the seats outside.”

The cafe cannot use the outdoor space behind their building, as it is occupied by the neighboring cafe, The Den.

Ms Barnett said she felt abandoned by the council after rallying to help with the community’s response during the coronavirus pandemic.

“We did a lot for counseling during the pandemic and we fed 100 elderly people for 10 weeks for counseling. They would contact me and ask me to come and get people, watch them and bring them food. also made 3,000 Easter eggs for NHS staff, ”she said.

“I think the upheaval on the Old Bridge is over and it has become safer to ride a bike. It also makes life easier for buses and taxis.

“We only have seven meters of sidewalk, so that’s only two car spaces they would lose and we would be very happy to pay for a fence to keep people safe.”

A Herefordshire Council spokesperson said: ‘During the pandemic many hotel outlets were able to apply for temporary pavement licenses which we were happy to support to allow local businesses to do business safely and in the best possible way. . These temporary licenses are due to expire at the end of September.

“The temporary pavement license at this particular location used the space created by the Emergency Active Travel Measures (EATM), introduced to allow safer social distancing on the pavement. With the restrictions easing in July, we are in the process of removing EATMs and, to support businesses, we have agreed to postpone the removal of measures for which temporary pavement licenses have been granted until after the end of September, expiration date. ”

“It has been clear throughout the process that such temporary pavement licenses are not a long-term option. Companies can always apply for new pavement licenses, which will be reviewed on their relative merits. ”

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Cafes

What happened to the guitar? Hard Rock Casino, Café signage is covered

Just days after Cincinnati’s Hard Rock Café and Casino unveiled its giant guitar signage, it was covered up again. A large black plastic wrap now covers the iconic oversized Gibson guitar, along with other new signs that read “Hard Rock Casino”. Asked about the black packaging, a company spokesperson said, “We continue to do renovations to open the Hard Rock Casino. We provided a preview of the renovations last week when the Hard Rock Cafe opened and will reveal all new renovations later this fall. The downtown Cincinnati casino has undergone a large-scale rebranding, replacing Jack Casino that was there before it. Hard Rock badges have adorned the building for months now. The transition began amid the coronavirus pandemic. As company officials held a groundbreaking ceremony on Wednesday afternoon, they said the casino is not just about gambling, but entertainment as well. “We’re going to have live music three days a week when the Hard Rock Café opens. We have museum quality memorabilia from Elton John to Mötley Crüe to Eddie Van Halen.” You will notice the changes right away. Upon entering the parking lot, patrons will see a mural depicting Ohio music icons like Tracy Chapman, Rosemary Clooney, and Bootsy Collins. Inside, there are musical memorabilia galore. You can see everything from Lady Gaga’s elaborate costumes to a Porsche 911 previously owned by Eddie Van Halen. Take a look inside here. The building itself is also receiving new features. “There’s going to be a lot of local connections. There’s going to be a tribute to Kings Records. Bootsy Collins has donated a piece directly to this property since he was with Kings Records,” Goldhoff said. The casino also has a unique Hard Rock Café, which opened last week.

Just days after Cincinnati’s Hard Rock Café and Casino unveiled its giant guitar signage, it was covered up again.

Large black plastic wrap now covers the iconic oversized Gibson guitar, along with other new signs that read “Hard Rock Casino”.

Signage is believed to have been covered up as further developments occur at the casino and restaurant.

Asked about the black packaging, a company spokesperson said, “We continue to do renovations to open the Hard Rock Casino. We provided a preview of the renovations last week when the Hard Rock Cafe opened and will reveal any new renovations later this grave. “

The downtown Cincinnati casino has undergone a large-scale rebranding, replacing Jack Casino that was there before it. Hard Rock badges have adorned the building for months now.

The transition began amid the coronavirus pandemic. As company officials held a groundbreaking ceremony on Wednesday afternoon, they said the casino is not just about gambling, but entertainment.

“It’s part of the music theme,” said Hard Rock president George Goldhoff. “We’re going to have live music three days a week when the Hard Rock Café opens. We have museum quality memorabilia from Elton John to Mötley Crüe to Eddie Van Halen.”

You will notice the changes right away. Upon entering the parking lot, patrons will see a mural depicting Ohio music icons like Tracy Chapman, Rosemary Clooney, and Bootsy Collins.

Inside, there are musical memorabilia galore. You can see everything from Lady Gaga’s elaborate costumes to a Porsche 911 previously owned by Eddie Van Halen.

Take a look inside here.

The building itself is also receiving new features.

“There are going to be a lot of local ties. There is going to be a tribute to Kings Records. Bootsy Collins has donated a piece directly to this property since he was with Kings Records,” said Goldhoff.

The casino also has a unique Hard Rock Café, which opened last week.

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Bars

San Jose continues to close ailing Agave sports bar amid accusations of violence and prostitution – CBS San Francisco


SAN JOSE (KPIX) – Authorities in San Jose are aiming to shut down an embarrassing South Bay sports bar amid allegations of prostitution and violence, in addition to being the site of a recent fatal DUI crash.

The name was removed from the sign outside the Agave Sports Bar and Grill on Alma Street in San Jose, but the business was still operating on Wednesday. The question is for how long?

READ MORE: San Francisco woman convicted of stealing Walgreens while coughing, claims she had COVID-19

San Jose city officials filed a lawsuit against the facility on Wednesday, seeking to shut it down as a nuisance.

“It’s been a hot spot for many years,” said Dev Davis, a member of the city council, who represents the neighborhood of Willow Glen where the bar is located.

Davis said she supports the city attorney’s action to try to shut down the business.

“There has been violence on this site. Someone lost their life there because another person was too served there, ”she explained.

Last month, Alex Moreno, 32, was arrested on charges of impaired driving and manslaughter while driving a vehicle after supporting his construction company’s van into a crowded outdoor table, killing a woman and injuring two men.

Alex Moreno (San José Police Department)

According to the prosecution documents, Moreno was receiving oral sex while driving from a woman he met at the bar when the accident happened.

READ MORE: Affordable Housing in San Francisco’s Sunset District Moves Forward After Supes Committee Vote

Truck in sports bar dinners

(CBS)

“I cannot comment on the ongoing investigations at Agave Sports Bar, including whether they are involved in human trafficking or prostitution,” said San Jose Police Sgt. Christian Camarillo.

The city lawsuit alleges that undercover agents were solicited for prostitution by women working for the bar on two occasions in 2020.

Police said the business had also been investigated on several other fronts, including trying to bypass health orders and stay open during the COVID shutdown last year.

“They were offering the public not to park their vehicles in the parking lot, use a carpool service, or park their cars elsewhere so that it didn’t look like it was actually open,” the sergeant said. Camarillo said.

Repeated calls to the company for comment were not returned.

San Jose is also seeking homeowners to pay the city overdue fines of $ 25,000.

“I think it’s pretty obvious. They haven’t been good for the community, ”Davis said.

NO MORE NEWS: “Mountain View Is My City Too” – Lawsuit Brought Against City’s RV Parking Ban

A neighboring business with a similar name – the Agave Restaurant – is located on Monterey Highway. The owner of this establishment told KPIX that his business has been affected due to the bad publicity of the Agave sports bar. In fact, his restaurant reopened just a day after that fatal accident.


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Bars

These 10 boozy joints raise the bar for Austin’s cocktail scene


Yes that’s right, Austin has changed dramatically in the last ten or two years. And while most of us continue to bemoan the escalating traffic and lack of affordable housing, Austin’s growth – with a few traits of local innovation and creativity – has helped create a truly bar scene. accomplished.

From those with handcrafted cocktails and master mixologists, to those who brag about having wine bar maestros and delivering the best sips of alcohol, Austin’s bars – like its residents – are the perfect mix. art, ingenuity and vision.

We celebrate these beloved waterholes and heady hometown bar heroes at our annual CultureMap Tastemaker Awards.

Learn more about this year’s Bar of the Year nominees below, then join us on August 5th at Fair Market for our Tasting Event and Tastemaker Awards Program, where we’ll toast the winner. . Tickets are on sale now.

Coconut Club
If you can’t have a good time at the Coconut Club, you might as well bury your head in the sand. This two-story downtown bar and dance club, owned by Cole Evans and Brian Almaraz of Cheer Up Charlies, is a tropical party that comes to life. And while some cocktails perfectly embody the beach vibe, anything goes when it comes to the bar offerings here. And that hospitable vibe extends beyond drinks to the very heart of the bar: at the Coconut Club everyone is welcome, the queer community is celebrated, and heaven comes in the form of dancing the night away.

Drink good
This dark, softly lit neighborhood bar is known for its ‘well-balanced’ cocktails and food as much as it is for its visionary owner Jessica Sanders, who takes as much care in crafting the house cocktail menu as she is championing Austin restaurant and community. of the bar and its precious employees. Not only does Drink.Well have a stellar happy hour and imaginative drink menu, but drinkers can learn a thing or two about the art of the cocktail from the knowledgeable bar staff.

Garage
Housed in – you guessed it – a parking lot in downtown Austin, this unpretentious, industrial-inspired cocktail bar walks the fine line of being accessible while also offering an elegant range of cocktails that would impress even the more difficult of sippers. The space is lounge and enticing, and the drinks are of a variety that makes you want to linger for another, especially the Old Fashioned, which may be the best in town.

Kitty Cohen’s
This cheerful terrace bar and lounge on the east side is an oasis that invites sun lovers to sit back and relax with a refreshing summer-inspired drink with friends. From frozen concoctions and classic cocktails, beer, wine, and a few seasonal drinks perfect to take a break from the hot Austin summer, Kitty Cohen’s is a sexy place serving up sexier drinks.

The little darling
This laid-back, mostly open-air joint exudes the soul of South Austin and is hailed for its outdoor vibes and savory bites, as well as its beer and liquor offerings. After all, what Austinite doesn’t dig out by scoring a spot at a picnic table under a heirloom tree with light strings or enjoying a garden game (beer in hand, of course) with friends?

LoLo
Natural wines are all the rage these days, and there’s no better place to try and buy these biodynamic beauties than the East Sixth Street Wine Bar and LoLo Shop. Featuring an impressive rotating selection of natural wines, which visitors can try on-site or purchase to taste at home, LoLo also offers a menu of small bites to pair with wines by the glass or by the bottle, as well as others. libations. And the expansive patio easily attracts visitors to sip and stay a spell.

Long-term salon
At the Long Play Lounge, whether it’s the original location of the St. Johns neighborhood or the new East Side bar, which took over on East Cesar Chavez Street when Stay Gold left, the music is as important as the drinks. With over 400 vinyl records spanning all genres, the good tunes don’t stop, as do the bar’s excellent craft cocktails and local craft beers.

City of Nickel
If you’re looking for a cool dive bar in Austin where the drinks are cheap and the beer is cold, you’ll look to Nickel City, the place on the east side of mix (drink) master Travis Tober and Brandon Hunt from Via 313. Settle into the huge bar for a drink and a beer, or savor a perfectly crafted cocktail while you wait for your chance to sample wings and fries from the on-site Delray Café food truck.

Small victory
This city center bar inspired by underground bars may be small, but it is powerful in terms of carefully prepared cocktails and knowledgeable staff. You can’t beat classic cocktails here, but this intimate and quirky joint truly triumphs when bartenders are left on their own to create truly spectacular concoctions.

The horseman
East Side bar Le Cavalier wants you to be you, Austin. And that means relaxing on the patio with your puppy and enjoying classic cocktails, cold beer, ‘decent wine’ and southern pub food. Or maybe it means popping a jello shot or frozen Red Headed Stranger mezcal drink while killing your dart friends. Either way, you are welcome here. At the Cavalier, there is only one rule: don’t be a jerk.


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Nightclubs

Slain bouncer could be alive if Fargo nightclub didn’t allow guns, mother says


In the seven weeks since the 28-year-old was fatally shot In a parking lot west of Africa International Restaurant and Nightclub in Fargo, the Jacksonville, Fla. woman posted numerous photos of her son online.

“The violence must be completely stopped,” she said in a telephone interview with The Forum.

Police continue to investigate McNair’s death, but the case has been difficult to resolve, said Captain Chris Helmick, who heads the Criminal Investigations Division of the Fargo Police Department. One of the challenges detectives face is trying to find people who can tell them what happened in the parking lot.

A fatal shooting took place in the parking lot of the Africa restaurant and nightclub in the early morning hours of Sunday, May 23, 2021 in Fargo. David Samson / The Forum

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“I’m convinced that there is someone who was there that night who could come forward and tell us what happened, and we need that person or people to come forward … and help us with it. that, ”he said.

Helmick declined to provide information on a potential suspect, citing the need to preserve the integrity of the case. No one was excluded as a shooter, he said.

Police have filed more than 100 reports in the case, which is more than usual for a homicide, he said.

Employees appear to have been cooperative, but management likely knows more than they tell investigators, Helmick and Police Chief David Zibolski said.

It’s a claim that Francis Brown, a former business partner who helped open the restaurant, disputed in a phone interview with The Forum.

“I gave them statements after statements,” said Brown, who was a manager at the time of the shooting. “I told the police everything.

City commissioners voted unanimously on July 1 to suspend the club’s liquor license for 60 days after Zibolski cited numerous appeals to the club.

RELATED:

Brown has resigned as manager, but he insists the restaurant and nightclub are a safe place.

“I have nothing more to do (with this). I’m done with it, ”Brown said. “Probably being the face is a problem. “

When the Forum attempted to contact the owners of Africa, staff said they would not comment. The employees also refused to take a message for the owners.

McNair’s mother said she believed more police were needed to resolve her son’s death. She also questioned Brown’s honesty and accused him of covering up the club.

“I feel like Francis made it worse,” Domond said. “As a parent, it’s the most painful thing for someone to call you and tell you that your child has passed away. It’s even more painful to know that my son died working for you (Brown), and that you’re not even a man enough to stand up and say,… ‘This young man lost his (life) in my establishment.’ “


A makeshift memorial behind the Africa International Restaurant and Nightclub appears to honor the victim of a shooting that took place on Sunday, May 23, 2021 in Fargo.  David Samson / The Forum

A makeshift memorial behind the Africa International Restaurant and Nightclub appears to pay tribute to the victim of a shooting that took place on Sunday, May 23, 2021 in Fargo. David Samson / The Forum

McNair grew up in Jacksonville where he helped raise awareness about homelessness, Domond said. He stayed in a homeless shelter for some time starting in December, she added.

He was able to get a grant for the shelter after documenting conditions at a shelter, she said. McNair went to another homeless shelter and helped them get blankets, food and other supplies.

“He really never met a stranger,” Domond said, noting that his son wanted to help others.

He then moved to Fargo to seek a better life, she said. She had no idea he had found a job at Africa until Brown called her to tell her that McNair had passed away, she said.

Authorities have yet to release details of what led to the shooting in the parking lot in the early hours of May 23 or how many people were involved. Police were reviewing video from multiple cameras when The Forum spoke to Helmick in late June.

The department has also recovered several weapons, but investigators have yet to determine how they were involved, he said.

What is known is that at least three employees have been authorized to carry weapons inside the club. McNair and another bouncer also had guns that night and walked into the parking lot with guns to tell customers to leave, Zibolski said.

McNair was not legally allowed to have a gun since he was a convicted felon, Zibolski said.

Bouncers told police Brown told them to clear the parking lots after the bar closed.

But Brown denied that too.

“I would never allow my security to enter the parking lot to clear customers with guns in hand,” he said.


A fatal shooting took place in the parking lot of the Africa restaurant and nightclub just after 2:10 a.m. on Sunday May 23 in Fargo.  (Matt Von Pinnon / Forum)

A fatal shooting took place in the parking lot of the Africa restaurant and nightclub just after 2:10 a.m. on Sunday May 23 in Fargo. (Matt Von Pinnon / Forum)

Brown told police McNair was hired as a bouncer at Africa a week before his death, according to Zibolski. McNair was working as security the night he was fatally shot, Zibolski said.

Brown claimed McNair was just hanging out at the club with a bouncer.

“He was not our employee,” Brown said, adding that he had never heard of McNair’s name before seeing it in the media. “I don’t know who this guy is. I never knew him. So we have nothing to do with it. “

Zibolski noted that the documents were not filled out to show McNair was employed, although he noted reports that most bouncers, including McNair, were paid in cash instead of being listed in the books.

Police stand by their claims that McNair was employed by the club, spokeswoman Jessica Schindeldecker said.

Helmick could not say if employees with guns in the club and bouncers taking them into the parking lot to clear customers were a contributing factor in McNair’s death.

“I think anytime you have alcohol and guns mixed together it’s a recipe for trouble,” he said. “I don’t think bar bouncers are eliminating customers, either inside the bar or in the parking lot, and having guns is good practice.”

Domond said she believed McNair’s death could have been avoided had the bouncers and her son not been allowed to carry guns in the club. She also said she was angry with McNair for having a gun on Africa.

“My son had a gun, the other bouncers had a gun, everyone had a gun,” she said.


Former manager Francis Brown, left, and owner Cory Schultz stand on Monday, July 29, 2019 at the International African Restaurant and Night Club, 4554 7th Ave.  S., Fargo.  Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Former manager Francis Brown, left, and owner Cory Schultz stand on Monday, July 29, 2019 at the International African Restaurant and Night Club, 4554 7th Ave. S., Fargo. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Brown said the city had never raised any issues regarding Africa, but Zibolski told city leaders he met with Brown on March 11 to discuss a bouncer interfering with an investigation into a brawl in the February 14 which took place outside the bar. The chef also suggested that Brown buy a card scanner to make sure that no minors are allowed in the bar.

Former Africa lawyer Stephen Baird previously told city commissioners he took over as general manager of the club on July 1, the day the license was suspended. He said the facility was working to resolve the issues.

Less than a week later, on Wednesday July 7, Baird announced he was stepping down from the managerial position.

“As of today, Stephen Baird no longer has any association with Africa International Restaurant and Night Club and is no longer employed by the company in any capacity,” the statement said.

He did not provide a reason for leaving but said he had no further comments.


What appears to be a bullet hole is seen in a garage door at the Cheyenne Estates apartment complex in Fargo, where Santino Manjadit Makur Marial, 41, was shot dead on August 28.  Flowers were also placed near the row of garages.  April Baumgarten / The Forum

What appears to be a bullet hole is seen in a garage door at the Cheyenne Estates apartment complex in Fargo, where Santino Manjadit Makur Marial, 41, was shot dead on August 28. Flowers were also placed near the row of garages. April Baumgarten / The Forum

Helmick said he understands why people are wondering why this crime is taking longer to solve than other homicide investigations. He said the ministry had a good track record in tracing culprits.

The Fargo Police Department solved 21 of 23 murder and manslaughter cases it had from 2016 to last year, according to data from the North Dakota Attorney General’s Office. This gives the agency a clearance rate of 91%.

Last year, the department filed six of its seven investigations for murder and manslaughter. The only case that remains open from 2020 is the fatal shooting of Santino Manjadit Makur Marial, 41. It is not known whether the August 28 murder along a row of apartment garages at Cheyenne Estates, 1104 44th St. S., was random or targeted.

No suspect has been named in this case either.


Saint-Marial

Saint-Marial

As in the case of McNair, Helmick said he believed there were people who had information about Marial’s death, but they did not come forward. The people who were with Marial provided as much information as they could.

“But that’s not enough to solve this case,” Helmick said, urging people who may have information to come forward.

Like family and friends, detectives are frustrated that they haven’t found any culprits in either case, Helmick said. They will continue to work on business as much as possible, he added.

“We don’t like unsolved murders,” Helmick said. “I am confident that we will resolve these cases. “

Anyone with information that can help resolve McNair or Marial’s cases is urged to call the Fargo Police Department at 701-241-1405. They can also send advice by SMS to 847411 with the keyword FARGOPD.


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Bars

Pedestrian stores sue My Brother’s Bar for open-air catering domes in parking lot


A LoHi shoe salesman wants to kick off his restaurant neighbor’s outdoor dining setup.

Boulder pedestrian stores have sued My Brother’s Bar, claiming the restaurant’s igloo-shaped domes and picnic tables prevent access to the shoe store’s parking spaces.

The 52-year-old shoe retailer, owner of the building that houses his Denver store at 2368 15th St., filed a lawsuit against his next door neighbor in Denver District Court last week.

The My Brother’s Bar property is owned by 2376 15th Street Re LLC, which is managed by Denver-based St. Charles Town Company. This entity is also named as the defendant in the lawsuit.

According to the record, in 2006, the former owners of adjacent properties entered into an easement agreement to create a shared parking lot behind the two plots. To access the approximately 6,250 square foot lot with approximately 30 spaces, motorists enter through Platte Street – the side occupied by My Brother’s Bar.

“It is unfortunate that after 15 years of continuous use of the parking lot this is necessary,” said Richard Polk, owner of Pedestrian Shops. “But we remain hopeful that there will be a positive resolution for everyone.”

In June 2020, after the pandemic, the restaurant received temporary permission from the city to extend outdoor seating in the parking lot. The restaurant then built a removable chain at the entrance to Rue Platte, prohibiting cars from entering the lot, according to the lawsuit.

My Brother’s Bar – whose efforts to recover from the pandemic landed it recently on a TV show – has six tables covered with igloo-shaped domes and four picnic tables outside in the parking lot, according to owner Danny Newman.

BusinessDen File

Pedestrian Shops purchased the LoHi building in which it operates for $ 2 million in 2017.

“In the midst of the pandemic, we have been working with all of our neighbors to make sure we are all able to survive these trying times,” Newman said. “Because we were able to operate our restaurant safely, we brought business into the neighborhood that wouldn’t have been there otherwise. “

Newman is a tech entrepreneur who also recently purchased the Mercury Cafe in Arapahoe Square in Denver.

Pedestrian Shops said in the lawsuit they agreed to refrain from enforcing their easement rights in July, but neighbors have set an October 31, 2020 end date for the landscaping. The shop says that “although it is not clear and without admitting the point, the forbearance agreement may have been extended by email until June 30, 2021”.

According to the lawsuit, Pedestrian Shops requested in person, by email and by cease and desist letter to clear the obstruction in the parking lot, but nothing changed as of July 1. The lawsuit was filed on July 2.

The shoe retailer is seeking punitive damages to be determined in court.

“It has been difficult to lose the use of our parking lot for a year, and it certainly wouldn’t be good for us to lose it permanently,” said Polk.

In March, Pedestrian Shops, which also has two stores in Boulder, put its 4,000-square-foot, two-story Denver property on the market for $ 3.3 million.


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Restaurants

Atlanta restaurants. Food stalls serving soul, smoothies and funnel cake fries will open in Northwest Atlanta Food Hall Chattahoochee Food Works


A soul food stand, superfood and smoothie bar, and comfort food stand will open later this fall at Chattahoochee Food Works, the Northwest Atlanta food hall on the outskirts of the Underwood Hills neighborhood. .

The first 13 restaurant stalls and a central bar are now open to the expansive 31-stall market and test kitchen, supported by celebrity chef and Weird foods host Andrew Zimmern and Robert Montwaid – the man behind New York’s Gansevoort Market.

The new stands

Selvasana
Owned by Juan Felipe Segura, Selvasana will serve acai bowls, smoothies, juices and sparkling fruit drinks, as well as a variety of salads on the menu.

Food truck stop
The food truck, owned by Jashaun and Lauren Lowery, will open a permanent location at Chattahoochee Food Works, serving its grilled lobster and crab cheese sandwiches, shrimp baskets and crab and funnel cake fries.

The daily soul of Delilah
Voted Best Mac and Cheese by Oprah Winfrey, Philadelphia chef and cookbook author Delilah Winder is opening a soul food stand at Chattahoochee Food Works this fall. In addition to the Oprah-approved mac and cheese, Delilah’s Everyday Soul will also serve fried chicken, Southern staples like fried green tomatoes and strawberry lemonade.

In addition, the food stalls Belen de la Cruz – Empanadas and pastries, Hippie Hibachi, Philly G Steaks, Cubanos ATL, It’s Baked Baby, and Dash and Chutney are slated to open later this summer. LoRusso’s Italian Market, serving Italian-style sandwiches and New York deli-style dishes and selling Italian and European food, and the raw Smoked Pearl bar opened earlier in June. Both belong to Montwaid.

Chattahoochee Food Works is part of the the Works complex, an overhaul of several warehouses located along an industrial strip off Chattahoochee Avenue bordering the Underwood Hills and Blandtown neighborhoods. The 80-acre development will eventually include 500 residences, a boutique hotel, retail stores and the completed food hall, 13-acre green space and full-service Fox Bros. outposts. Bar-BQ and California restaurant for breakfast and brunch the waffle experience. Scofflaw Brewing opened the Dr. Scofflaw Lab and Beer Garden at the factory last fall.

Atlanta-based coffee company Brash recently installed a mobile coffee bar at the Works inside a refurbished 1968 Citroen parked outside the food hall. Brash owner Chris McLeod and Stop Think Chew chef Julia Kesler Imerman are teaming up to open Brash Kitchen early next year. Once opened in the resort’s Maker Building, the all-day cafe will serve dishes influenced by Kesler Imerman’s Jewish and South African origins and McLeod’s Australian roots.

A third Fetch Park dog park and bar in the Atlanta area opens this year at the plant in a green space adjacent to the parking lot near the entrance to Ellsworth Industrial Boulevard.

Chattahoochee Food Works and the Central Bar are open daily from 11 a.m.



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Nightclubs

Person shot dead near club in vibrant Greenville


One person is in hospital after a nighttime shooting off Congaree Road in Greenville. The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office said it responded to Club Kream on Congaree Rd. Friday just before midnight. The report says a gunshot victim was found in a parking lot adjacent to the club. The victim was taken to a local hospital for at least one non-life threatening gunshot wound, according to Captain Jimmy Bolt. No arrests have been made and there are no suspects at this time. someone has information, they are told to call the sheriff’s office at 271-5210 or CrimeStoppers at 23-CRIME.

One person is in hospital after a nighttime shooting on Congaree Road in Greenville.

The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office said it responded to Club Kream on Congaree Rd. Shortly before midnight on Friday.

The report says a gunshot victim was found in a parking lot adjacent to the club.

The victim was taken to a local hospital for at least one non-life threatening gunshot wound, according to Captain Jimmy Bolt.

No arrests have been made and there are no suspects at this time.

If anyone has any information, they are asked to call the Sheriff’s Office at 271-5210 or CrimeStoppers at 23-CRIME.


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Cafes

Ragin Cajun Café brings a taste of New Orleans to Redondo Beach – Daily Breeze

There is a bright red giant crayfish inflatable arch marking the outdoor food court in the parking lot of the Ragin Cajun Café on PCH in Redondo Beach, looking in part like a decoration from a Mardi Gras float – and in part like a clip from a 1950s sci-fi movie about crayfish growing to immense size as a result of nuclear testing. (Remember “Them!” From 1954, about giant ants infesting the Los Angeles sewer system? To this day, I still think it was a documentary, not a monster movie!)

Either way, the giant crayfish are reminiscent of the general craziness the Ragin Cajun has brought to South Bay in its multiple incarnations – including two on Pier Avenue in Hermosa Beach. I miss the originals. But I’m glad the PCH branch managed to survive – like N’awlins himself, no matter the storms, she’s always there, ready to party. As it says on the menu, “The easiest treat you can find west of Bourbon Street…”

It is also one of the spiciest.

If you ask, they’ll bring you a metal rack of homemade hot sauces, ranging from bearable to cleansing your sinuses for next year. I believe the hot sauces here could resuscitate the dead, if only they were a little hungrier. And it’s a place worth coming back to – a crazy joint serving food straight out of Crescent City, in a bustling space worthy of if not the (too touristy) French Quarter and then the nearby Warehouse District.

On a good night’s sleep, the aptly named Ragin Cajun captures the food, spirit and funk of The Big Easy. It’s a crazy amount of fun, especially if you’re going with a bunch of revelers who wanted to pretend it’s Mardi Gras, even when it’s not. And it’s a pleasure to enjoy the N’awlins atmosphere, without the risks of a night out on Bourbon Street, with its plastic containers filled with diabetic cocktails.

Which isn’t to say that there isn’t a lot to drink here. The drinks menu is as big as the food menu – bigger, in fact. And all the good brands are on the drink list – Abita Root Beer and Hank’s Orange Cream Soda, as well as five Abita beers from NO, including Purple Haze Raspberry Wheat and Turbo Dog Brown Ale. They make a Rum Hurricane (“Based on Pat O’Brien’s Original Recipe”), which revelers drink by the gallon in the neighborhood. (I’ve been there, I’ve never seen people so drunk – mid-afternoon!) There are also cocktails served in smoking skulls: Blue Voodoo, Reaper, El Diablo. There is a special edition Ragin Margarita served with food only. It helps the survival rate.

And what better with a strong drink, than strong flavors, which brings us to okra. It’s a wacky creation with so much in it: amazing chicken sausages, veggies, rice, broth and flavor – a bayou of flavor. It is mixed with jambalaya, a cousin of paella, turning into a homemade creation called “gumbalaya”. Get your gumbalaya with red beans & rice and sausage, accompanied by gravy shrimp or smothered crayfish. You can hear the Dixieland bands playing in the streets, I swear you can.

  • Much of the menu at Ragin Cajun Café is built around the good things you can do with spices and gravy. The restaurant even has its own brand of hot sauce. (Photo by Merrill Shindler)

  • The dining room is simple and the food is simply delicious at the Ragin Cajun Café in Redondo Beach. (Photo by Merrill Shindler)

  • Follow the oversized “crayfish” and you’ll find the outdoor dining area at the Ragin Cajun Café in Redondo Beach. (Photo by Merrill Shindler)

Much of the menu is built around the good things you can do with spices and gravy – like I said, the restaurant has their own brand of hot sauce on every table. Fried is a big deal too, but not essential. With fried, it is blackened and grilled.

There are levels of spiciness as well, for those who fear peppers, although there is a fair amount of spiciness. Like Sichuan cuisine, it comes with the territory. And regardless of the level of spice, the choices are plentiful. While okra is a no-brainer, the peeled shrimp eaten in the seafood boil is pretty good; I eat it all, because there is good in the shells.

There are fish preparations – especially catfish, which takes me back to the bayou childhood that I never had. Cajun fried chicken is always a good choice; if you are a little adventurous, try the “Gators & Tater”. And yes, the fried alligator really tastes like chicken. Or at least, a chicken that lives near a swamp.

Po’boys are grilled, blackened or fried; there is a 16 ounce rib eye; and this being the South Bay, there’s a vegan combo, a Beyond Burger vegan, fried okra, and fried cauliflower. There are silent puppies that would make Emeril Lagasse (do you remember him?) Say “Bam!” And there’s the pecan pie for dessert.

Giant crayfish outside are not hostile like ants in the sewers. Their message is in, and take a good cold Abita. You all.

Merrill Shindler is an independent Los Angeles-based food critic. Send an email to [email protected]

Ragin Cajun Coffee

  • Rating: 2.5 stars
  • Address: 525 S. Pacific Coast Hwy., Redondo Beach
  • Information: 310-540-7403; www.ragincajuncafe.com
  • Cooked: cajun
  • When: Lunch and dinner, every day
  • Details: Complete bar; large reservations
  • Atmosphere: The third incarnation of the beloved Ragin Cajun brings a lot of joy to a post-pandemic world with Cajun music, Cajun vibes… and Cajun food. As they say at the bottom of the Bayou, “Let the good times roll!” ” (“Let the good times roll!”)
  • COVID-19 Security: Very good with a sprawling outdoor patio, limited indoor seating, and well-masked staff.
  • Prices: About $ 35 per person
  • Suggested dishes: 12 Appetizers ($ 11- $ 26), 8 Salads ($ 8-26), 9 Bols Bayou ($ 10- $ 31), 6 Po ‘Boys ($ 14- $ 19), 4 Sandwiches ($ 15), 7 Appetizers ($ 28- $ 48), 9 Cajun favorites ($ 19 – $ 48), 5 desserts ($ 9 – $ 10), 16 Happy Hour dishes ($ 7 – $ 9
  • Credit card: MC, V
  • What do the stars mean: 4 (World class! Worth the trip from anywhere!), 3 (Very excellent, if not exceptional. Worth the trip from anywhere in Southern California.), 2 (A great place to go for a meal. Worth the trip from anywhere in the neighborhood.) 1 (If you’re hungry and it’s nearby, but don’t get stuck in traffic.) 0 (Honestly, not worth it. speak.)
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Nightclubs

Man hospitalized after car shooting near North Side nightclub, police say


SAN ANTONIOEditor’s note: Police first told us that a security guard shot a man in the chest and he was in critical condition. After receiving a preliminary report from the police, the information changed dramatically.

A man is hospitalized following a drive-by shooting near a North Side nightclub, San Antonio police say.

The incident began around 5 a.m. on Saturday in the parking lot of the Diamonds Showclub, located at 2525 NE Loop 410.

Witnesses told police they were with the 24-year-old, waiting to enter the club, when a brawl broke out and a shooting ensued.

The man and witnesses, three women, hid behind bushes near the gunfire, officials said. He then offered to drive the three women to their car at the nearby apartment complex, police said.

As they drove through the apartment complex, a man and woman were walking down the middle of the driveway when the 24-year-old asked them to move, officials said.

A d

The couple ran to their car, possibly to get a gun, police said. The man then dropped the women off at their car and he and his friend started to leave the complex.

Police said when the man and the three women left the complex in their vehicles and entered Loop 410, another car exited the complex.

The vehicle headed for the man’s car and began shooting at him for at least a block, authorities said.

One of the bullets hit the man and he went to a Valero gas station on Starcrest and 410 and called for help.

The man was taken by EMS to Brooke Army Medical Center with non-life threatening injuries, police said. The suspect is still at large.

In the initial incident in Diamonds, police said a security guard shot a red pickup truck that shot in the air and possibly other people.

Officials said it does not appear that anyone was shot dead in the incident.

A d

The case is still ongoing.

San Antonio Police Release Body Camera Video Of Fatal South Side Shooting Involving Officers

Woman arrested month after motorcyclist died in West Side hit-and-run crash, records show

Copyright 2021 by KSAT – All rights reserved.


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Cafes

Cafe in Illawarra joins growing list of COVID-19 exposure sites across NSW

An Illawarra cafe is on a growing list of COVID-19 exposure sites across NSW as the suburban cluster now has six cases.

The addition of the Broken Drum Cafe to Fairy Meadow comes after a man who tested positive for the virus visited the scene.

The Sydney man in his 30s had also visited Bondi, Surry Hills and Westfield Bondi Junction. His infection was reported last night but missed the 8:00 p.m. reporting period and will be counted in tomorrow’s figures.

Transmission of COVID-19 has occurred in and around Westfield Bondi Junction.(

ABC News

)

The other new case today was a woman in her 40s who lives in the Bondi Junction area. How and when she became infected was still unknown, but she regularly walked through the Westfield Mall, NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard said.

These latter two cases join the 60-year-old limo driver who experienced the onset of symptoms around June 13 and was the first reported case in the eastern suburbs cluster. It was discovered that he had contracted the highly infectious Delta strain.

His wife was then diagnosed with the coronavirus. Her case was quickly followed up by a woman in her sixties who was sitting in front of the Belle Café de Vaucluse at the same time as the limousine driver was inside the room.

Health officials believe there must have been a cross-event between the two people at some point because the woman also contracted the Delta strain.

It was reported yesterday that a man in his 50s had been infected after standing near the limo driver for a few seconds.

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said it was frightening how a “fleeting passage” is all it takes in some cases for the virus to spread.

Due to the epidemic, wearing a mask on public transport is mandatory in Greater Sydney until next Thursday.

Further restrictions have been ruled out at this point, but authorities have urged residents of the eastern suburbs to minimize their exposure to others.

As the number of sites visited by infectious cases increases, residents of NSW have also been urged to check regularly NSW Health website for exhibition site updates.

As of 5:00 p.m. Saturday, the following were identified by NSW Health as areas of concern.

Anyone who visited Bondi Junction, including the parking lot, at the following times was asked to take a COVID-19 test, even if they had no symptoms.

  • Westfield Bondi Junction, 500 Oxford Street, June 12 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
  • Westfield Bondi Junction, 500 Oxford Street, June 13 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
birkenhead point
Anyone who has frequented the Birkenhead Point Brand Outlet is considered an occasional contact.(

Provided

)

Anyone who has visited the following locations is considered close contact and urged to immediately test and self-isolate for 14 days.

  • David Jones Bondi, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 12 from 10:55 am to 11:15 am
  • Harry’s Coffee Kitchen, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 15 from 3:10 p.m. to 3:55 p.m.
  • Myer Bondi, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 12 from 11:15 am to 11:50 am
  • Tea Gardens Hotel, 2-4 Bronte Road, Bondi Junction, June 13 from 5:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.
  • Levain Bakery, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 11, 12:35 p.m. to 12:50 p.m.
  • David Jones Bondi Level 1, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 15 from 3:55 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
  • Event Cinema, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 13 from 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • The Broken Drum Cafe, 6/78 Princes Highway, Daisy Street, Fairy Meadow, June 18 from 10:20 a.m. to 10:40 a.m.
  • Harris Farms, Shop B1, 51-57 Norton Street, Leichhardt, June 15 from 9:50 a.m. to 10:05 a.m.
  • Amaroo Tavern, Amaroo Drive, Moree, June 4, 4:50 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
  • Adora Handmade Chocolates, 2/325 King Street, June 13 from 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Café Macquarie Park Cemetery, Macquarie Park Cemetery, Corner Delhi Road and Plassey Road, June 15 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
  • Northmead Bowling Club, 166 Windsor Rd, Northmead, June 13, 3:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • The Twisted Olive, 684 Bourke Street, Redfern, June 13 from 12:50 p.m. to 1:20 p.m.
  • Wax Car Wash Cafe, 375 Cleveland Street, Redfern, June 14 from 12:25 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.
  • Rocco’s, 103B Laguna Street, June 14 from 10:55 am to 11:30 am
  • Belle Café, 103 New South Head Road, Vaucluse, June 11 from 9:15 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. June 12 from 10:20 am to 10:45 am. June 12 from 1:20 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. June 13 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 15 from 9:50 a.m. to 10:25 a.m.
  • Washoku, 52 New South Head Road, Vaucluse, June 12 from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
IKEA
Anyone who visited IKEA in Tempe on June 16 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. should get tested and self-isolate.(

Provided: IKEA website

)

Anyone who has frequented the following places is considered casual contact and is encouraged to get tested and self-isolate until a negative result.

  • The Health Emporium, 263-265 Bondi Road, Bondi, June 15 from 12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
  • Fruitologist, 151 Bondi Road, Bondi, June 15 from 12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
  • Aldi, Eastgate Bondi Junction, 71-91 Spring Street, June 14 from 11:20 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.
  • Bondi Junction Interchange Food Court, 422 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 15 from 3:05 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.
  • Bondi Junction Westfield Level 5 Food court, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 13 from 1:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.
  • Daiso, 430 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 16 from 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m.
  • Eastgate Bondi Junction – Ground Floor Food Court, 71-91 Spring Street, June 14 from 11:15 am to 11:25 am
  • Ichiban Boshi, 1 / 171-173 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 16 from 11:40 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  • Miter10, 452 Oxford Street, June 16 from 12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
  • Myer Bondi Junction Level 2, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 13 from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
  • NAB at Westfield, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 15 from 2:45 p.m. to 3:10 p.m.
  • Woolworths, Westfield Bondi Junction, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, June 14 from 2:15 p.m. to 2:40 p.m. June 13 from 4 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.
  • The Alkalizer, Campbelltown Council Building, 91 Queen Street, June 15, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
  • Spotlight on Castle Hill, 12 Victoria Avenue, June 15 from 11 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.
  • Content International Design and Luxury Store, 19 / 20C Hills Super Center North 18 Victoria Ave, June 15 from 11:20 am to 11:45 am
  • Birkenhead Point Brand Outlet, 19 Roseby Street, June 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
  • Flower Power Garden Center, 609 Old Northern Road, Glenhaven, June 12 from 2:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
  • Eden Gardens, 307 Lane Cove Road, Macquarie Park, June 13 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
  • Stocklands Merrylands Shopping Center, Merrylands, 1 Pitt Street June 14 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • Café Omega, 145 Balo Street, Moree, June 4 from 7:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and from 1:50 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
  • Greenwood Grocer, Greenwood Plaza. lower level, 71/36 Blue Street, North Sydney, June 15 from 5:00 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.
  • IKEA, Tempe, 634-726 Princes Highway, Tempe June 16 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
  • Decathlon, 634-726 Princes Highway, Tempe, June 16 from 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m.
  • Field to Fork, 101 New South Head Road, Vaucluse, June 11 from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • Plants Plus, 95 Castle Hill Road, West Pennant Hills, June 12, 12:30 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
  • Coles, East Village Shopping Center, O’Dea Avenue, Zetland, June 14 from 12:05 p.m. and 12:10 p.m.
  • East Village Shopping Center, O’Dea Avenue, Zetland, East Village 4 Defries Avenue, June 14 from 11:45 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.
  • Lorna Jane, Zetland, East Village Shopping Center, T12A East Village, 4 Defries Avenue, June 14 from 12:00 p.m. to 12:05 p.m.
  • Taste Growers East Village Shopping Center, Shop 39/2 Defries Avenue, Zetland, June 14 from 11:50 am to 12:05 pm
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