close
Nightclubs

Mayor Should Change Boston’s COVID-19 Vaccination Policies

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu announced a plan to implement a COVID-19 vaccine requirement for “certain indoor public spaces” during a speech Monday morning. “Vaccination is the most powerful tool we have to fight this pandemic,” Wu said when announcing the B Together Initiative. From January 15, customers will need to prove that they have received at least one dose of the vaccine to enter restaurants, bars, nightclubs, gyms and indoor entertainment. Full proof of vaccination will be required for adults by February 15. “We are also setting dates for children to be vaccinated to enter these spaces, starting in March,” Wu said. Affected businesses will be required to place a sign at the main entrance and verify proof of vaccination. ‘a customer at the entrance. Acceptable evidence will include a vaccination card from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a digital image of the card, an image from another official vaccination record, or a COVID-19 vaccine verification app. Wu’s administration said Boston plans to develop its own app for this purpose. Sixty-eight percent of Boston’s population is fully vaccinated, the Wu administration said. So far, only 31 percent of the city’s population has received a booster. Meanwhile, Boston health officials are reporting an increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases and associated hospitalizations. Wu, who supported the proposals to identify vaccines as a candidate, said her new policy was devised after conversations with New York City officials. She was also joined on Monday by leaders from several neighboring towns and villages, who expressed support for Boston’s plan. Communities represented included Brookline, Salem and Somerville.Gov. Charlie Baker said Massachusetts was working with other states on a digital proof of vaccination tool, but he specifically opposed the idea of ​​a warrant. On Monday, the Baker administration said it would share more details about the partial digital vaccine schedule “in the coming weeks.” At one point, speakers raised their voices above the noise as protesters sang “The Star-Spangled Banner”. For the communities that have not put these measures in place, I want these residents to speak louder than what you hear here and demand that they be put in place in our city, ”said the outgoing mayor of Somerville, Joe Curtatone, who said he and the next mayor would seek similar policies in this city. While some small business owners attended the press conference in support of the indoor mask mandate, the state chapter of the National Federation of Independent Businesses called it an added burden on already struggling businesses. . placed in the unenviable position of having to implement another government health directive, ”Christopher Carlozzi, state director of the organization, said in a statement to The Associated Press. Also on Monday, Wu announced an updated vaccination policy for city workers that will require them to be fully vaccinated or be fired. About 90% of the city’s employees are already vaccinated, she said. Wu mayor’s predecessor Kim Janey announced in August that the city’s 18,000 workers would be required to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo rigorous weekly testing. This policy, which was phased in over two months, also applied to on-site contractors and volunteers who provide on-site services on city sites, including all full-time workers, to part-time, seasonal, emergency and on probation. Wu’s new vaccination policy will eliminate the ability for Boston employees to submit proof of a negative COVID-19 test every seven days as an alternative to full vaccination. said Sunday. “We are at a time when health must come first.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu announced a plan to implement a COVID-19 vaccine requirement for “certain indoor public spaces” during a speech Monday morning.

“Vaccination is the most powerful tool we have to fight this pandemic,” Wu said during his announcement of the Initiative B Together.

From January 15, customers will need to prove that they have received at least one dose of the vaccine to enter restaurants, bars, nightclubs, gyms and indoor entertainment. Full proof of vaccination will be required for adults by February 15th.

“We are also setting dates for children to be vaccinated to enter these spaces, starting in March,” Wu said.

Affected businesses will be required to place a sign at the main entrance and verify a customer’s proof of vaccination at the entrance.

Acceptable evidence will include a vaccination card from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a digital image of the card, an image from another official vaccination record, or a COVID-19 vaccine verification app. Wu’s administration said Boston was considering developing its own app for this purpose.

Hearst property

The City of Boston poster features the “B Together” program announcement.

Sixty-eight percent of Boston’s population is fully vaccinated, the Wu administration said. So far, only 31 percent of the city’s population has received a booster.

Meanwhile, Boston health officials are reporting an increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases and associated hospitalizations.

Wu, who supported the proposals to identify vaccines as a candidate, said her new policy was devised after conversations with New York City officials. She was also joined on Monday by leaders from several neighboring towns and villages, who expressed support for Boston’s plan. Communities represented included Brookline, Salem and Somerville.

Gov. Charlie Baker said Massachusetts was working with other states on a digital proof of vaccination tool, but he specifically opposed the idea of ​​a warrant. On Monday, the Baker administration said it would share more details about the partial digital vaccine schedule “in the coming weeks.”

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

As city officials discussed the announcement, protesters began chanting and chanting aloud at city hall. At one point, speakers raised their voices above the noise as protesters sang “The Star-Spangled Banner”.

“There is nothing more American than coming together to make sure we take care of each other,” Wu said in response.

“For the communities that have not put these measures in place, I want these residents to speak louder than what you hear here and demand that they be put in place in our city,” said the outgoing mayor of Somerville. , Joe Curtatone. , who said he and the next mayor would seek similar policies in that city.

While some small business owners attended the press conference in support of the indoor mask mandate, the state chapter of the National Federation of Independent Businesses called it an added burden on already struggling businesses. .

“It is unfortunate that once again private companies are placed in the unenviable position of having to enforce yet another government health directive,” Christopher Carlozzi, state director of the organization, said in a statement. provided to The Associated Press.

Also on Monday, Wu announced an updated vaccination policy for city workers that will require them to be fully vaccinated or be fired. About 90% of the city’s workers are already vaccinated, she said.

Wu mayor’s predecessor Kim Janey announced in August that the city’s 18,000 workers should be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo rigorous weekly testing. This policy, which was phased in over two months, also applied to on-site contractors and volunteers who provide on-site services on city construction sites, including all full-time, part-time, seasonal, emergency and probationary.

Wu’s new vaccination policy will eliminate the ability for Boston employees to submit proof of a negative COVID-19 test every seven days instead of being fully vaccinated.

“We are taking steps to ensure that we increase protections across the city as the number of cases increases,” Wu said on Sunday. “We are at a time when health must come first.


Source link

Richard Dement

The author Richard Dement